Trekking Pole Help

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
1,100
26
Central Kansas
I'm looking into getting some trekking poles this year. After reading about them and having a buddy have them on a hunt last year I think I want to give them a try. A couple questions, what style does everyone like (sections that slide within each other with adjustable tabs or the interlocking ones similar to tent poles) and what type of grip does everyone like (cork vs foam and straight vs the ergo look)? I'm sure its mostly personal preference, but any tips? Any tips on determining height? I'm 5'10" with longer legs and a bit shorter torso and fairly long arms (thanks dad)
 

Umpqua Hunter

Veteran member
May 26, 2011
3,563
48
56
North Umpqua, Oregon
My first were twist lock Leikis with aluminum poles and twist locks. I really like them but folded one packing out a ram in tough terrain. Leiki made the repair for free. These are now my wife's trekking poles.

I now use Black Diamonds with carbon fiber poles and flip locks. They are much more robust but nearly the same weight. I am very happy with them.
 

Team Kabob

Very Active Member
May 9, 2014
759
114
I can send you a set from REI! If you don?t like them, we can return them. Leki is the poles I have been eyeing. Same brad I use for ski poles.




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Tim McCoy

Veteran member
Dec 15, 2014
1,855
3
Oregon
Black Diamond Distance Z. They interlock more like tent poles, not length adjustable, but very few worries about a twist or lever locks giving out. Been bullet proof so far.
 

Dos Perros

Member
Jul 1, 2015
128
0
I have some carbon Komoerdells I got a sweet deal on from REI. The elastic cord broke. My buddy has the Fizan?s that are always in Massdrop and they are awesome, going to get some of those. Lighter, cheaper, more durable.


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Ikeepitcold

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 22, 2011
9,191
294
Reno Nv
I use the twist lock style with a rubber handle that keeps my hand from slipping. My hands can get sweaty so I like that about the handle.

Another big thing is to get poles that have a spring in them that act like a shock absorber. They will give a little at each step. I really like this vs a solid pole.
 

ivorytip

Veteran member
Mar 24, 2012
3,759
29
Screenshot_2018-03-08-08-00-49.jpg these things are amazing, my hiking and hunting buddies always end up with them for some reason... They are absolute knee savers!
 

CoHiCntry

Veteran member
Mar 31, 2011
1,391
19
Colorado Mountains
I’ve been using the same pair of Leki trekking poles for probably 15 years now. They have lasted all these years so I would definitely check them out. I don’t use them hunting though. Only hiking & backpacking.
 

huntabsarokee

Member
Feb 27, 2012
51
0
Northeast PA
I switched to the Black Diamond Distance carbon Zs. These do not adjust but the handle is slightly longer than ours I have used so you can adjust your grip height to make up for going down hill or up hill. They also make it in a slight different variety that has like 10 cm of adjustment had 3 letters in its name. What I like about these is they only weight 10 oz for the set so I don't find myself leaving them at camp. Plus they fold down very small for packing.

I am guessing at 5'10 probably their 120cm version is about right in these.
 

RANGER619

Member
Sep 27, 2011
96
0
MN
I have a 2 sets of the Z poles. If you get this type make sure to take them apart each time when you are done with them. I have a set that I used all summer for training and would just throw them in the truck each time without breaking them down. Over the course of the summer between sweat and grime they now require 2 vice-grips and a hammer to get them apart. I now have a training set and a hunting set. Hauling around 2 vice-grips and a hammer in the backcountry to fold up my trekking poles kind of goes against the lightweight pack thing:rolleyes:
 

Work2hunt

Veteran member
Mar 2, 2013
1,366
11
St. Louis, MO
I've got Lekis with the cam lock. The adjustability is great especially going up and down hills. If you have a long downhill run, lengthen the poles some. If you are going up hill, shorten the poles.
 

geargrinder

Member
Feb 24, 2015
114
0
Dayton, NV
The $30 carbon Cascades from Costco is a great set to see if you like them or not.

They are decently made and lighweight with cork handles.
 

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
1,100
26
Central Kansas
Thanks guys! Will it just say in the description about the spring or just be able to feel the difference when using them? Any benefits to carbon vs aluminum? Doesn't look like carbon saves much weight really.
 

tttoadman

Very Active Member
Nov 16, 2012
629
0
Oregon
carbon will be lighter.
Carbon will break if overloaded. Aluminum will bend. I have bent mine, and bent it back and off I went.

I bought these for the kid, and they are pretty nice. I would never have poles without adjustment. As said above, you need to be able to adjust different for uphill vs downhill. Forget about the trails. Being able to adjust short and long on a side hill is a lifesaver.
https://www.leki.com/us/trekking/poles/2487/micro-vario-ti-cor-tec/?c=708
 
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tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
1,100
26
Central Kansas
Thanks for the info everyone. I'll keep browsing around and see what I end up with. Anyone use them to rest a gun on or anything like that?
 

jtm307

Active Member
Jan 12, 2016
165
6
Wyoming
I picked up a pair of Mountainsmith Pinnacle trekking poles from Sierra Trading Post for $25. They lasted me 2 seasons, roughly four weeks of total hunting and 12 animals harvested. One pole wore out. The other bent beyond repair after I fell on it. I think I got my money's worth. Trekking poles are an absolute must in my opinion.