Pack weight? Who weighs theirs and how much?

HIcountryman

New Member
Nov 30, 2019
7
5
CO
Horse outfitter weighed my pack at the trailhead in 2018: 64 # with muzzleloader , binocs 10 x 42, spotting scope, tripod, food, 3 L water, xtra clothes, tent, pad, bag... all hunting stuff for 10 days. Trying to shave pounds each year. Got a little lighter in sleeping pad and bag in 2019 and took less extra clothes.
Looking at a new tent that will shave weight off - Big Agnes tiger wall 3P for me and my brother this year. Will use it on backpacking trips with the family too, this year.
I have grown accustomed to this weight. It's nice to load it with a fully boned out deer: quarters, + ribs, shanks, heart, cape and head - pack it to car/cooler, then come back for camp. I have busted out with camp in the dark, or stayed another night soaking up the starlight and appreciating my aching muscles. The pack out at sixty pounds feels quite comfortable after a heavy load of deer.
 

Slugz

Veteran member
Oct 12, 2014
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Woodland Park, Colorado
Ill weigh mine when i get home.. I run a non standard Kifaru set up with an essential kit, hunt kit, emergency kit, food ( 1 day) and water 95% of the time. Hunt from a base camp.
 

Slugz

Veteran member
Oct 12, 2014
2,950
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Woodland Park, Colorado
Nice breakdowns here guys! I too am looking into the shelter and sleeping bag to spend a night somewhere if needed. Other than that I've compared my list to just about every single one posted on here and some special input from Slugz and don't see where I can cut any more weight and still be as prepared as I want to be. Ultimately my pack/rifle equates to about 1/3 of my body weight haha. To me its simple, be in peak physical condition and the pack will be your last concern.
Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1
 
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taskswap

Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
254
110
Colorado
I updated my scouting/general backpacking list using a nice free tool called LighterPack.com:

For three days this is a good load for most seasons in Colorado, down to about 25F overnight (35F comfortably). I have a 0F bag and some other things I swap in if I'm expecting colder weather.

I just got an Eberlestock J34 "Just One Pack" from another forum member here. I'm excited to try it out next year. Right now I have too many packs: backpacking vs. hunting, day vs. multi-day trip setups, etc. I'm always worried I'm going to forget something. My hope is this setup will let me get down to just two packs: one for all general use (backpacking out of season, hunting, etc.) and one lumbar pack set up as a grab-and-go for upland game.

I'll post the final setup here once I get it all repacked. The J34 is really nice because it has a removable duffel that slides into the main compartment. You can pack your multi-day/overnight gear into that, then pull it out and leave it at camp to make the remaining portion into a day pack/meat hauler. I really like the idea - we'll see how it goes in 2020.
 
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Browntrout55

New Member
Feb 8, 2019
23
27
Priest River Idaho
I usually run around 70lbsfor a week. I’m trying to get down but old habits die hard. I’m used to an Alice pack but I have a stone glacier sky talus now. I like it but the straps seem vulnerable to be. But, they have held up great so far. I had and Eberlestock in Afghanistan so I could carry my M40 A 5 but it was garbage. It could barely carry 20lbs. I do not know what the model was and I’m sure it was underpowered for what I was using, not knocking Eberlestock. I’m sure in the right situ they are great. I do like Mystery Ranch also, but why are a little pretentious. Alice Rucks are hard to beat
 

DanPickar

Active Member
Mar 4, 2014
236
39
Wyoming
I'm sitting at 12.8lbs currently. Water will add around 3lbs and another pound or so of daily food. I'm running an Eberlestock F1 Mainframe with 2 batwing pouches, rifle scabbard, small accessory case, and pack mounted shooting rest. Rifle weighs exactly 9lbs and binos will be another 29oz attached. So all total I'll be around 28lbs. Ive carried this exact setup but with a heavier gun for 6 miles/day with ease, love the pack frame.
This is the same pack style I run, minus the rifle scabbard. Throw in my spotter, small tripod, game bags, food and water and I bet I'm right around 22 lbs total.
 

BrandonM

New Member
Nov 9, 2011
49
30
I'm a pack geek and a spreadsheet geek, too. A number of years ago after going on a 7 day hunt, 8 miles into the Wind River Range in WY with a 65 lb pack (without water, mind you), I made it my mission to lighten up the load with better gear. Over the course of a few trips and spreadsheet analysis from pre-weighed items that I'm constantly adding to my list options, I was able to shave 30 lbs off my multi-day pack for a 7 day trip! Total game changer, especially if you don't have to pack in water. I HATE packing in water.

For day trips, my pack is usually in that 20-25 lb range max, depending on the time of year. Obviously, early season requires less "just in case" clothing for day hunts than the later season hunts do. My personal favorite day hunting setup is my Eberlestock Mainframe (tall version) and batwings. It is minimal and quiet with the ability to pack out a ton of weight if need by after tagging an elk or deer.

One of the problems with ultra, ultra lightweight gear is the noise. To get that lightweight the fabrics are very thin and lightweight, making day hunting with some of the gear on a bit of a challenge, especially for bowhunters.

Besides lightening the load in my pack, I've gravitated toward really lightweight footwear. The old adage of a pound on your feet is like 10 in your pack is so true. My first pack trip when I wore lightweight hikers (the Zamberlan Yerens at the time, now I wear their Trail Lites), I was dumbfounded at how much energy I still had once we got into our spot to glass. Usually I would be wiped out and ready to sit on my butt and stay behind the glass for most of a day, but changing to lighter boots opened my mind to the benefits of lighter boots. Even when temps drop, light boots with good gators will take me comfortably into temps down to about 20 degrees F.
 
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ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
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www.eastmans.com
This is the same pack style I run, minus the rifle scabbard. Throw in my spotter, small tripod, game bags, food and water and I bet I'm right around 22 lbs total.
For day hunts I am pretty similar, I have some first aid equipment as well.
 

THelms

Administrator
Staff member
Dudes definitely get into the weeds on this topic for sure... I get the geeking out but I don't obsess over what my day pack weighs I just carry what I need and don't worry about it. Backcountry hunts are another matter though.
 

Fink

Veteran member
Apr 7, 2011
1,879
70
West Side, MoMo
Dudes definitely get into the weeds on this topic for sure... I get the geeking out but I don't obsess over what my day pack weighs I just carry what I need and don't worry about it. Backcountry hunts are another matter though.
Lol, you mean you don't gotta count ounces on a day hunt that takes you less than 2 miles from the truck?

My day pack list: kill kit, owie kit, poo poo paper, treats, water bottle w/steripen (in case I get thirsty) and a hoody (in case I get cold)
 
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