base layer

gman1

Active Member
Nov 29, 2011
164
4
North Dakota
Last fall I purchased a top and bottom base layer of 32 Degree heat and am planning for an elk hunt and don't know if this is a good product to use for the dead of winter or not? Yes, I am having a senior moment but if anyone could help me out with this it would be great. Have any of the members used this as a base layer/ underwear?
Thanks for your help
Gman
 

Slugz

Veteran member
Oct 12, 2014
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Woodland Park, Colorado
Are they a good product for cold weather?
I think to answer that it would depend on the hunt.

Easy hike in. Not much movement. Easy pack out. Not much sweat. Then those will keep you warm as a base layer. As you increase your activity level I'd say you may be more comfortable and warmer in something that will draw the sweat away and evaporate it.
 
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kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
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idaho
no need to over think it .I just wear what I WEAR every day. hanes and wranglers . I did buy a pair of those expensive kuiu attack pants a couple years ago , wasn't impressed.
 
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JimP

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Mar 28, 2016
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While most are found wearing every day articles of clothing, most rescues that take place are done for people that are unfamiliar with the outdoors.

I was on a search and rescue team in Utah and most if not all of the calls that we got were for people that were totally unprepared to be out in the elements no matter what they were wearing. A lot of them were in shorts and flip flops. The hunters that we had to locate were usually just lost, didn't get back to camp at the correct time or just sitting in a bar to get away from their wives. When a wife called in to report that her husband was going to kill himself the bars were the first places that we would look for him in.
 
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JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
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Ohhhhh the stories that I could tell about people lost out in the woods or desert. From naked folks to a person who literately hugged a tree as he died. Some are funny and then there are the ones that bring a tear to your eyes as you realize what it did to the family.
 

RICMIC

Veteran member
Feb 21, 2012
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You don't need to overthink the base layer concept too much, other than to avoid cotton and cotton blends. I have worn the light weight army issue poly (Polartec), light weight merino wool blend (KUIU), heavier merino (Minus 33), and others. I used to teach winter camping, and led groups into the BWCA wilderness area, and still hunt for cow elk in January in WY. Just layer up according to the conditions with the insulating layers in-between and a good wind-blocker shell on the outside.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
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The big problems that I usually see are that people do not dress for the conditions that they are headed into.

You wouldn't wear a heavy set of wool pants, shirt, and jacket to hunt in a area where the temperatures are getting up there with no rain or snow in the extended forecast. That is also where all these new modern fabrics are not needed.

You just need to pay attention to what you are walking into and prepare accordingly. With any of the new fabrics that are designed to keep you warm and dry you should be happy. But you need to consider what you are doing also. Are you planning on doing a lot of hiking? If so then you don't need the heaviest base layers out there, are you planning on just a short hike and then sitting all day? Then you may want to consider a heaver base layer. There is really no set answer. I like to suffer a little in the early morning and be comfortable the rest of the day. Others want to be comfortable all day long.
 

Winchester

Veteran member
Mar 27, 2014
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Cascade, Colorado
Good discussion Jim, but even when people do "dress for the conditions that they are headed into", as you know, sometimes Mother Nature changes those conditions … sometimes quite drastically and suddenly.
I like RICMIC's advice to "Just layer up according to the conditions".
Carry your extra layer(s) in your pack, then you'll be able to handle just about anything Mother Nature throws at you.
 
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Hilltop

Veteran member
Feb 25, 2014
3,109
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Eastern Nebraska
Iv'e been trying to work my base layer off at the gym...:rolleyes: In all seriousness, the main benefit to the high priced clothing offered today is weight and comfort. I have layered with really cheap clothing and remained warm in -30F before. I looked like the kid from a Christmas Story but I shot my limit of geese. The new stuff just allows you to add insulation without the bulk. I still stay pretty cheap but I do have decent base and mid layers for colder hunts now.
 

kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
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idaho
I've had lots of people tell me ,"only a fool goes into the woods alone."

to which I reply," I do not agree but if your a fool you shouldn't go into the woods alone. and your safer to go alone then to bring a fool along!"
 

tim

Veteran member
Jun 4, 2011
1,892
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north idaho
i have some of the 32 degree. they will work just fine. I have used them for all kinds of activities, from snowmobiling, to winter fat biking.
they will stink sooner than merino and the cuffs and elastic will stretch quicker, but i use them. they are pretty inexpensive if i remember,. they where a christmas gift.