Straight vs. Angled Spotting Scope Eyepieces

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
Hello, my name is Kirk and I am somewhat new to Eastmans forums. As I have only curiously pawed through the posts of others for the past few years, and this will be my first post. I primarily hunt elk and deer with a bow and a rifle in a variety of western states. Currently, I am trying to decide between a straight vs. an angled eyepiece in the Swarovski spotting scope line up, and all my previous scopes have had straight eyepieces. I have heard about some of some advantages and disadvantages of each, but I would like to know what others have found out for themselves and what work arounds they have employed while on a hunt to counter the disadvantages of each. Thanks in advance for your input.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
6,051
6,032
68
Gypsum, Co
It's all a personal preference.

I like angled but then I am 6'4" and by the time you get that tripod up high enough for me to see through it things get wobbly. At least with a angled one I can bend over a little to look through it. Granted you can stoop down a little for a straight one too but i can bend easier than I can stoop.

The difference would be if you are sitting where a angled one being a little bit lower than a straight eyepiece might be down in the grass where the straight one is above it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Colorado Cowboy

go_deep

Veteran member
Nov 30, 2014
2,531
1,689
Wyoming
I like the angled. When the wind is howling I can sit and keep it really close to the ground, plus the sitting position is more comfortable. Also my spotter can twist so when I use the window mount the angled spotter is easier to use from the seat of your truck antelope or late season cow hunting.
 

CODAK

Active Member
Aug 8, 2016
377
282
Johnstown, CO
ATX angled guy here. You can look any direction at any angle with angled. Rotate the axis or tripod is any way. Neck fatigue is natural instead of straining upward. Straight is for the truck. Angled is for hunting. Only negative is acquiring target quickly but with practice it’s easy to learn!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bonecollector

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
ATX angled guy here. You can look any direction at any angle with angled. Rotate the axis or tripod is any way. Neck fatigue is natural instead of straining upward. Straight is for the truck. Angled is for hunting. Only negative is acquiring target quickly but with practice it’s easy to learn!
Thank you CODAK. How do you deal with a light rain while using your ATX? Do you use you hand or hat to shield the eyepiece, or are you rotating with some benefit?
 

CODAK

Active Member
Aug 8, 2016
377
282
Johnstown, CO
I usually am fine with rain jacket hood up and hit brim. Generally try to glass from the shade, so that means under cover of a tree or rock outcropping, so not much weather seems to affect glassing
 

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
It's all a personal preference.

I like angled but then I am 6'4" and by the time you get that tripod up high enough for me to see through it things get wobbly. At least with a angled one I can bend over a little to look through it. Granted you can stoop down a little for a straight one too but i can bend easier than I can stoop.

The difference would be if you are sitting where a angled one being a little bit lower than a straight eyepiece might be down in the grass where the straight one is above it.
I like the angled. When the wind is howling I can sit and keep it really close to the ground, plus the sitting position is more comfortable. Also my spotter can twist so when I use the window mount the angled spotter is easier to use from the seat of your truck antelope or late season cow hunting.
Thank you for tips go_deep. Your comment about the wind and staying lower is something hadn’t thought of before.
 

sneakypete

Veteran member
Aug 9, 2011
2,747
175
Oakdale Ca.
I prefer angled, almost all sheep guides use angled. I have a vortex 11/33/50 and I use it on a ballhead. The reason for the bullhead is that I can pick apart an area by rolling the angled spotter. I don’t recommend a ballhead for bigger spotters though.
 

Ranchhand02

Member
Jan 3, 2012
80
5
Western Oklahoma
I like angled also. I am running vortex optics and have for several years. I am a tall guy also and the angled eyepiece lets me keep the trip I lower and more stable. It also allows me to get by with a lighter and smaller tripod.
 

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
Thanks everyone. I am definitely now leaning towards the Swarovski ATX in the 25-60X x 65 mm, but I’m not going to lie about being overly excited on carrying the extra 6 - 7 ozs. in my pack mile after mile vs. an ATS in the 25 - 50X x 65 mm.
 

go_deep

Veteran member
Nov 30, 2014
2,531
1,689
Wyoming
Thanks everyone. I am definitely now leaning towards the Swarovski ATX in the 25-60X x 65 mm, but I’m not going to lie about being overly excited on carrying the extra 6 - 7 ozs. in my pack mile after mile vs. an ATS in the 25 - 50X x 65 mm.
Functionality trumps 6 oz. any day in my book.
 

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
I understand go_deep, but I am going to have to convince my 57 year old knees on how many miles that 6 oz. is going to save me at some during the hunt.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
6,051
6,032
68
Gypsum, Co
Surely you can find 6 oz to trim somewhere else.

Years ago I took everything out of my packs and laid it on the floor. I got rid of most of everything that I didn't use. I used to carry a couple extra knifes besides the one that I had on my hip, got rid of them, I had a couple of different sharpening items and I got rid of them. I figured that as long as my belt knife held up until I was finished cutting up the animal on the hill that I could resharpen it when I got back to the truck with the first load of meat. Extra ammo also went. I am a good enough shot that I don't need 20-40 rounds extra that doesn't get used.

Now if it is for a extended stay I'll weed out other things and add some things. Extended stay packs are always a lot heaver than day packs.
 

captkirk1963

New Member
Mar 8, 2015
6
0
Washington
Surely you can find 6 oz to trim somewhere else.

Years ago I took everything out of my packs and laid it on the floor. I got rid of most of everything that I didn't use. I used to carry a couple extra knifes besides the one that I had on my hip, got rid of them, I had a couple of different sharpening items and I got rid of them. I figured that as long as my belt knife held up until I was finished cutting up the animal on the hill that I could resharpen it when I got back to the truck with the first load of meat. Extra ammo also went. I am a good enough shot that I don't need 20-40 rounds extra that doesn't get used.

Now if it is for a extended stay I'll weed out other things and add some things. Extended stay packs are always a lot heaver than day packs.
Rest assured that I have gone through the ounce counting pack dump exercise several times in my long hunting career, and I re-evaluate my gear needs for every hunt every year in spreadsheet format. At some point, every successful hunter has to decide when they’ve arrived at their personal minimum. Thank you.
 

Bonecollector

Veteran member
Mar 9, 2014
5,589
3,134
Ohio
Thanks everyone. I am definitely now leaning towards the Swarovski ATX in the 25-60X x 65 mm, but I’m not going to lie about being overly excited on carrying the extra 6 - 7 ozs. in my pack mile after mile vs. an ATS in the 25 - 50X x 65 mm.
the wide angled lens is a difference maker and worth the 6 oz.