Question About Hunting in Africa

highplainsdrifter

Very Active Member
May 4, 2011
657
15
Wyoming
Is there any place in Africa where a person can hunt with a license and not have to pay extra for each animal you shoot?

In the U.S., a hunter typically buys a license and when that license is filled he/she does not have to pay for the animal that is shot. From what I have seen of African hunting, it looks like you typically pay for each animal that is shot.

Just curious.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
I doubt it.

On my safari I booked with a outfitter that ran a special of 6 trophy animals and 2 culls for just under $6000. The thing with a lot of Africa and especially South Africa is that the animals belong to the property owners and they can do as they want. You can set up a hunt where you only pay a day fee and then pay for what you shoot, each animal has a dollar amount on it, but it can get expensive that way unless you only want to shoot one or two animal in a couple of days.

Other countries will be different than South Africa but you would expect to have to pay day fees and then the trophy fee of the animal that you shoot. I don't know of anywhere over there that you can just purchase a license and then shoot a animal, plus a professional hunter is required for anyone hunting.

On my hunt I took 5 of the 6 animals and 2 of them would make the Safari Club record books. The one that I didn't care to shoot was the dieker, a very small antelope the size of a dog.
 

highplainsdrifter

Very Active Member
May 4, 2011
657
15
Wyoming
I doubt it.

On my safari I booked with a outfitter that ran a special of 6 trophy animals and 2 culls for just under $6000. The thing with a lot of Africa and especially South Africa is that the animals belong to the property owners and they can do as they want. You can set up a hunt where you only pay a day fee and then pay for what you shoot, each animal has a dollar amount on it, but it can get expensive that way unless you only want to shoot one or two animal in a couple of days.

Other countries will be different than South Africa but you would expect to have to pay day fees and then the trophy fee of the animal that you shoot. I don't know of anywhere over there that you can just purchase a license and then shoot a animal, plus a professional hunter is required for anyone hunting.

On my hunt I took 5 of the 6 animals and 2 of them would make the Safari Club record books. The one that I didn't care to shoot was the dieker, a very small antelope the size of a dog.
That is what I thought based on what I've read. I'll be going to Tanzania soon on a nonhunting related trip. I want to find out more about hunting practices while I'm there...in case I want to go back and hunt someday.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
I'm on a African hunting forum, it has all kinds of answers for someone like you that wants to see what is what.

I recommend that you join up and do some searching on it and if you have any questions then ask away. There are outfitters, PH's, and a lot of great folks on it.

https://www.africahunting.com/community/
 

CrimsonArrow

Very Active Member
Feb 21, 2011
691
26
Minnesota
I’ve looked at a lot of African outfitters, and they’re basically all the same. You choose the animals and pay for them like a meal off a restaurant menu
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
You can pay as you go per animal along with day fees, or find a outfitter that has specials set up.

I went the way of the special, 6 trophy animals plus 2 culls. Overall I saved a couple thousand dollars.
 

kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
3,926
724
idaho
never wanted to go around the world killing weird lookin critters when I got cool lookin ones to shoot right here.:cool:
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
A person hasn't lived until he heads out of the good old USA to do some hunting. The way that you are taken care of is incredible plus having the opportunity to shoot a few animals that most people will never see in the wild or the US unless you can afford one of the private exotics ranches down in Texas.

One of the nicer things about it is that the common man can go do it for less than what a lot of guided hunts here in the lower 48 states charge. It doesn't get real expensive until you start bringing the trophies home. But if you look at the cost of a Yukon moose hunt then that is close to what everything would cost over in Africa including bringing the trophies home and having them mounted as long as you don't go after some of the more exotic animal or the big 5.
 
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mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
1,943
294
A person hasn't lived until he heads out of the good old USA to do some hunting. The way that you are taken care of is incredible plus having the opportunity to shoot a few animals that most people will never see in the wild or the US unless you can afford one of the private exotics ranches down in Texas.

One of the nicer things about it is that the common man can go do it for less than what a lot of guided hunts here in the lower 48 states charge. It doesn't get real expensive until you start bringing the trophies home. But if you look at the cost of a Yukon moose hunt then that is close to what everything would cost over in Africa including bringing the trophies home and having them mounted as long as you don't go after some of the more exotic animal or the big 5.

This is sad but so true. Puts it into perspective as to how much these North American outfitters are charging these days. Its out of hand for the common man.

My mom and dad have been to Africa three times. He loved every minute of it. Obviously. lol
 

hunter25

Active Member
Sep 8, 2016
440
80
Glenwood Springs, Colorado
I've seriously considered going but eventually decided to not.
Simply because it would only be for myself.
I can do trips that include the whole family now for the same price. Usually fishing. But seeing how excited my grandson gets is worth more than anything.
Just booked costa rica just over a year from now for 7 people. Which will include 2 grandsons. Looking at about 8k total for everyone. 5 adults paying makes it easy

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

Rich M

Active Member
Oct 16, 2012
242
41
It's not for everyone.

I think I'd like to go to see the critters but have no desire to shoot any of them. Was told by a guy who used to live there, to go during the rainy season to see more animals.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
The only real places that you are going to see any animals is in the National Parks. Other than that over 90% of the animals that you can hunt are going to be on farms where the primary purpose of them is to be hunted. It is sad to say but in all the public lands areas the animals have been pretty much shot off long ago.

We took a tour from Capetown to the country of Lesotho and back to Port Elizabeth and all the wild animals that we saw were one kudu and one ostrich. Now this was in South Africa. You will also have a hard time finding any animals outside of the National Parks in Kenya and a few other countries over there. The people feel that if the animal doesn't pay for itself one way or another then they are worthless and done away with. That is why hunting is so important over there.
 

graybird

Active Member
Feb 22, 2011
339
41
Colorado
I've been to Africa three times and spent over a month of hunting days afield. With that, I've taken over 20 different species while there. There are certainly different ways to do it. If you go to destinations such as South Africa and Namibia, you can purchase a package from 5-10 animals and then hunt those animals specifically. You can also pay the daily rate and pay per animal a la carte. I've done it both ways.

Speaking specifically about TZ, you choose a 10, 16, 21 or 28 day license. Each of these licenses then grants the hunter to hunt specific species. You will then pay on a per head basis dependent upon what you shoot. For example, if you want to kill a Lesser Kudu, then you can only shoot one of those on a 21/28 day license. I'll also say TZ is one of the most expensive countries to hunt when considering all of the countries in Africa, yet they do have some specific species only huntable in their country.

This would be my advice to anyone considering hunting Africa: select 4-6 animals you think you want to hunt. Then, do some research on if these species are even found in the same geographical location. Select a reputable outfitter and go have a great time!!! Additionally, always carry extra cash with you because there will be an animal, or two, that you don't think you want to hunt until the day you have a monster step out in front of you and you can't resist.

Africa is one of the most economical hunts in the world.
 

WY ME

Very Active Member
Feb 4, 2014
528
14
Wyoming
I've been to Africa 5 times, 3 for work and 2 for hunting. Overseas travel is not for everyone but for some, such as myself, it can be fascinating. I always here folks comparing Alaskan hunting costs to African costs. To me that has no impact on my choosing one over another. Truth be told, I can't really afford either one. One major aspect missing to those who have never travelled to some of the "remote" countries of the world are the culture differences. The purpose of an Alaskan hunt is to kill an "X" while an African hunt may be a combination of killing an "x", "y" and some "Z's" and to also experience the African culture. It's hard to compare the two when the cost is the only factor you're looking at. Culture isn't a big deal to everyone and wasn't to me 25 years ago but I look at other places differently now and appreciate the experiences. I'd love to go back to Africa again sometime and do some more hunting but I don't know if it will ever happen. Africa's a cool place to see.

Me and my daughter are going fishing in Alaska this summer. This will be my 5th or 6th trip up there as well...sometimes for hunting, sometimes work and sometimes fishing. Sometime in the not too distant future I'll be hunting in Alaska again as well. It's all good!

Enjoy Africa Mr. Highplainsdrifter whether you're carrying a gun or not. Tanzania would be my first choice for hunting if not for the astronomical cost of hunting in that country. I've only stood on the Tanzanian border looking in and wished I could hunt there. Make sure you get the timing right so you can see the wildebeest migration while you're there.

Good luck!
 

Ike

Eastmans' Staff
Staff member
Feb 21, 2011
25
6
One way to think of it is the "trophy Fee", as they call it over there, is your license cost. You just pay for it after you harvest. That way you only pay for the animals you take and not everything. I hope you go. It is an absolute blast. Not just the hunting but the culture, no matter what country you are in. It will make you appreciate the US a bit more when you get back. Good luck! I hope you get to #RedLine the FUN Meter!
 
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tx2019

New Member
Jan 7, 2019
39
2
One way to think of it is the "trophy Fee", as they call it over there, is your license cost. You just pay for it after you harvest. That way you only pay for the animals you take and not everything. I hope you go. It is an absolute blast. Not just the hunting but the culture, no matter what country you are in. It will make you appreciate the US a bit more when you get back. Good luck! I hope you get to #RedLine the FUN Meter!
That's a good way of looking at it.
 

Yell Co AR Hunter

Active Member
Dec 10, 2015
413
64
Yell County Arkansas
I know a guy that has hunted on 6 of the 7 continents. He is an average guy that did taxidermy work on the side. Every dollar he earned from his second job went to pay for hunts. Viewing the mounts in his home is like going to an exhibit. He told me if you want to hunt you just have to be willing to be discipline enough to find a way to earn the money to pay for it. Problem is most of us are not and just dream of all the grand hunts we will never go on. My advise is if you wish to hunt Africa set the goal and put every dollar you can to reach it.
I have always wanted to hunt the barren ground caribou of Canada. I had the money set aside 25 years ago and keep putting it off. Now there is not even a season. One thing we all know is it will no get any more affordable and there is no guarantee the hunt will even be there.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,890
734
Gypsum, Co
What does it cost to bring your horns and capes back?
It all depends on how much you are bringing home.

First there are the dip and pack fees to make sure that there are no bugs.
Then you have the crating fee, around 15% of the dip and pack.
Now you have them in the crate and need a shipping company to get it to the airline

Five years ago I brought back 6 plains game trophies they were shipped in crate about 3 foot square and 10 inches high. And if I remember right it was around $3500 to my taxidermist front door