Looking to learn - backpack archery

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
1,100
26
Central Kansas
Your body will shed water through urination to adjust to elevation. Double your normal. A good filter or iodine or time to boil and cook water make up for what you don't have on your back. Most of the central and northern rockies have fairly abundant water sources. I'm also in CO and would be willing to do a BP trip with whomever what's to scout or check gear or even just get out and away.
Hey I appreciate the offer! We might just have ourselves a shindig going on up there this year! I'm really looking hard at SW Colorado. From what I can see there look to be plenty of lakes and creeks way up high, so I would think filtering shouldn't be a problem as long as I wouldn't have to drop down too low to get to good water. I'm assuming the lakes and stuff up there would be no big deal for drinking and wouldn't need much purifying?
 

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
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Central Kansas
What about number of people going up there to hunt? Matt pretty much talked me out of solo... didn't take too much though! I'm assuming the more people that go you would want to split up? Maybe share camp, but hunt other places? 2 seems like a good number, but what about 3 or 4? I know the chances are slim anyone shoots something, but do you increase or decrease the chances if more people come?
 

crzy_cntryby

Active Member
Dec 9, 2014
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Lots of guys run like that. Split off in singles or pairs to hunt different areas from a base camp. I'm in South Central CO. What parts of SW you looking at?
 

Matthoek21

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Mar 18, 2011
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Peachtree City, GA.
What about number of people going up there to hunt? Matt pretty much talked me out of solo... didn't take too much though! I'm assuming the more people that go you would want to split up? Maybe share camp, but hunt other places? 2 seems like a good number, but what about 3 or 4? I know the chances are slim anyone shoots something, but do you increase or decrease the chances if more people come?
Didn't want to talk you out of it completely, but for the first time you might want to go with someone. As long as you have a sat phone or spot you should be alright. Just for insurance and peace of mind.
As for the one vs. Two vs three or four. I believe two or four is better but it's hard finding 3 other people that hunt and think like you. If you have 4 you can basically cover double the ground. I would definitely recommend splitting up if you have four. Just establish which drainages and direction everyone is covering as to not stumble up on each other.
As for the filter and purifying, elk are usually close to water, you just may have to find it. It may be a spring that's in the dark timber. You will find water! Just remember iodine is lighter and less bulky than most water filters and you can treat large quanity's fairly quick. I usually have two bladders with me just in case water is scarce. Camping close to a water source is a huge benefit but be careful where. Not much water above timberline except for in the form of snow and that is not convenient for really staying hydrated.
 

BKHunter

New Member
Aug 27, 2015
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New York
Hey All,

Like tdcour I am new at the whole at west game and started buying my gear with the hopes of getting out there this fall. Very interested in the back pack trip everyone is speaking about. TD if we linked up on this trip and seem to have similar hunt interests I am open to partnering up with you on a hunt. Two greenies stumbling around the mountains what could go wrong (Joking of course). Anyway I think it is always ideal to have a partner god forbid something happened. Keep me in mind and hopefully we can work something out.

BK
 

crzy_cntryby

Active Member
Dec 9, 2014
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0
TD didn't catch part of an earlier post until I just reread it. There is beaver fever in a lot of CO waterways. Just plan on filtering or boiling.
 

RICMIC

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Feb 21, 2012
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520
Two Harbors, Minnesota
I have found that it is easier to hunt from a water source than to camp away from it and having to hike to water every day. Even a 24K topo map will show creeks that you can then follow up to what is often a spring source. That is the only water that you should risk not having to treat, as long as you take it straight from the source. All the wild critters and domestic cows crap in the woods, walk thru the stuff, and wade streams. E-coli, cryptosporidium, guardia (aka Beaver Fever) are definitely something that you don't want in the back country. I somehow picked up a dose of giardia while on a remote river in northern Manitoba a couple years ago. Luckily, I had made it home before the bug took hold. I lost 8# in two days before the antibiotics kicked in. Even melted snow is suspect and must be boiled unless is has just fallen.
 

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
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26
Central Kansas
How many arrows does a guy need to take? Ideally you will only need one, but what do y'all do? I have a tight spot quiver so I'd only be able to bring in 5 unless I figured something else out.
 

mallardsx2

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Jul 8, 2015
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I never leave the truck with less than 6 arrows. Learned the hard way one time... sometimes things dont go as planned....lol long story
 

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
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26
Central Kansas
That's exactly what I was wondering. Don't really want to be a long way from the truck and have to hike back for arrows. Talk about insult to injury!
 

amoor983

New Member
Dec 3, 2015
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I have yet to find a hunting buddy that will hunt my preferred style, so I have been going solo. I started out climbing mountains. The popular climbs usually have many people on the trail, so you are not really by yourself. It’s a good testing trip, though. Start small and work your way into more advanced expeditions. In the fall however, I would not count on other people being around. So, make sure you leave a detailed map and agenda with somebody. Leave a map and agenda on the dash of your vehicle. If you can text someone your lat/long at night, or when you get service, do it. If you can get a satellite distress signaler, do that. Keep a redundancy in navigation, like a map and compass and a GPS unit. Keep a good first aid kit. Take a couple ways to acquire water. In predator country (which is pretty much everywhere in the mountains), always have your gun on you. I guess its all the boy scout/backcountry stuff, but it’s even more important when by yourself. Ultralight is also very important, because you have nobody to split the weight of common items like a tent. Also know your limits. But know that your limits are not really your limits. You think they are, and then you get a second wind. But you need to find this out before you are 5 miles from the vehicle with 80 pounds on your back. So, you need to train. There is a certain amount of fear present when venturing out on your own, but when you conquer that it is very freeing and enjoyable. Just like anything, start small, work your way up, and pay attention to detail. Good luck!
 

tdcour

Veteran member
Feb 28, 2013
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26
Central Kansas
Anyone take any camp shoes or anything with them going in? I know after a long day in my hunting boots its nice to get into a pair of tennis shoes or flip flops or something. I doubt it is worth the weight bringing anything in, but just thought I'd ask if anyone brought something other than the boots on their feet in.
 

RANGER619

Member
Sep 27, 2011
96
0
MN
Anyone take any camp shoes or anything with them going in? I know after a long day in my hunting boots its nice to get into a pair of tennis shoes or flip flops or something. I doubt it is worth the weight bringing anything in, but just thought I'd ask if anyone brought something other than the boots on their feet in.
I take a pair of slip on shoes I bought at REI. They are about 12 ounces. Mine could be used to stalk in if I wanted. I like having them to help get my boots/socks dried out when the weather is warm
 

CoHiCntry

Veteran member
Mar 31, 2011
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Colorado Mountains
Anyone take any camp shoes or anything with them going in? I know after a long day in my hunting boots its nice to get into a pair of tennis shoes or flip flops or something. I doubt it is worth the weight bringing anything in, but just thought I'd ask if anyone brought something other than the boots on their feet in.
I bring some crocs on all my backpacking trips. I strap them them to the outside of my pack. They come in handy for stream crossings and are great for getting up in the middle of the night to take a leak and not have to put your boots on!
 

mnhoundman

Veteran member
Oct 25, 2012
1,234
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Minnesota
I took everyone's advice and brought some crocs with on my first backpack hunt, just tied them on the outside just like CoHiCntry said. I'm darn glad I did, it was a must to get my boots off at the end of the day and let the feet air out. And walk around camp, (these people on here are great to share all of these things to us rookies to get started on our addiction! ) THANKS!!
 
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Iron Mike

Active Member
Oct 23, 2014
369
1
Tumalo, Oregon
Croc Man here also. I strap them on to the outside of my pack like CoHiCntry & mnhoundman. They weigh 12 oz's and are worth every oz on my backpack trips. The little bumps seem to massage my feet and after a tough day they feel great. If its cold I just wear some socks with them. As you know taking care of your feet when packing in or even regular camp hunting is a must and having something comfy to slide your tired dogs into in my opinion is part of that. I can't think of many occasions where I would not bring them unless I just forgot them! Speaking of which now that I am thinking about it I dont think they are actually on my pack list! I better take care of that right now!!