Let the gov't goat slaughter begin!

WY ME

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Feb 4, 2014
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Wyoming
Tomorrow, Grand Teton Nat'l Park will start the gunning of mountain goats from helicopters in an effort to completely eradicate all of the goats within the park. They consider the goats to be an invasive species and a threat to the struggling bighorn sheep population. I sure wish they had that same heartfelt concern about the struggling moose herd in Teton Park and the Greater Yellowstone area. While they feel the goats are an invasive species it's perplexing why they don't feel the same way about the Alberta wolves the feds dumped on us. After all, the wolves have decimated the moose herd in this area.

Supposedly there is overwhelming public support for the goat eradication. Yeah right! On top of it they say they will likely leave the goats to rot on the mountain because of safety concerns. When I see what our government does it really makes me question why we even have wanton waste laws? Why do we get upset by poachers? Why do we fine people whose dogs chase or kill big game (I met one of those folks this morning)? Yet they tell us the hoards of wolves are good for the ecosystem.

What a joke!
 

JimP

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Mar 28, 2016
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If nothing else, why not issue tags for the goats!
I would imagine because they are within a National Park. They could perhaps isssue tags but I don't know what the regulations would be. Take Grand Canyon National Park and the bison hunt that they were suppose to have. I know that they started to "select" hunters but I think that is as far as it has gone and it has been a couple of years at least and no bison have been shot in the park.

I might have to do some searches on this.


Or relocate them.
My thoughts exactly but it might depends on their location and if it would be possible.

I know that when I was up in British Colombia on a bear hunt and watching the goats there would be no way to either net or trap them. This was the end of May into June.
 

CrimsonArrow

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Feb 21, 2011
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Yet the government allows ranchers to graze thousands of domestic sheep in wild sheep habitat, spreading disease. Hmm, I think the government likes money
 

WY ME

Very Active Member
Feb 4, 2014
528
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Wyoming
I would imagine because they are within a National Park. They could perhaps isssue tags but I don't know what the regulations would be. Take Grand Canyon National Park and the bison hunt that they were suppose to have. I know that they started to "select" hunters but I think that is as far as it has gone and it has been a couple of years at least and no bison have been shot in the park.

I might have to do some searches on this.




My thoughts exactly but it might depends on their location and if it would be possible.

I know that when I was up in British Colombia on a bear hunt and watching the goats there would be no way to either net or trap them. This was the end of May into June.
I hear what your saying but they managed to net sheep from helicopters in the same area in the last couple of years.
 

Colorado Cowboy

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Similar situation in Rocky Mt. NP in Colorado. It is overrun with elk and the NP Service hires people (I'll not call them hunters) to shoot elk and pays them. It is absolutely stupid to totally ban hunting in the National parks. They could make a lot of $$$ selling tags!
 

JimP

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I think that the problem with hunting in a NP is the perception that it is going to give those that don't hunt.

The shooters that they usually hire to thin out the elk herd are very good shots and they work withing very tight perimeters when they are shooting them. I doubt that you could get actual hunters to adhere to what the regulations would be. Some would but a lot wouldn't even if that was a condition of getting the tag.

I did a couple of searches on the bison hunt down in the Grand Canyon NP and I think that they canned it. All I can find is the information from 2 years ago where they were just talking about it and thinking of getting hunters to do it. I do remember that a couple of the qualifications for the hunters were that they had to pass a shooting test, along with being very physical fit. Then then didn't even get to keep all the meat, the article said that they only got around 60lbs or so.
 

kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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welp, there has never in the history of man ,been a government agency that was run with rational thought.

why start now?????????
 

nv-hunter

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Feb 28, 2011
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Yet the government allows ranchers to graze thousands of domestic sheep in wild sheep habitat, spreading disease. Hmm, I think the government likes money
Not sure about other states but there is a big buffer in Nevada between domestic sheep grazing areas and wild sheep populations. Nv has even bought out grazing permits to be able to plant sheep.
 

nv-hunter

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Feb 28, 2011
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Hunting was allowed in National parks at one point in time. I believe both Yellowstone and rocky mountain national parks had hunts in the past
 

Colorado Cowboy

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I think that the problem with hunting in a NP is the perception that it is going to give those that don't hunt.

The shooters that they usually hire to thin out the elk herd are very good shots and they work withing very tight perimeters when they are shooting them. I doubt that you could get actual hunters to adhere to what the regulations would be. Some would but a lot wouldn't even if that was a condition of getting the tag.

I did a couple of searches on the bison hunt down in the Grand Canyon NP and I think that they canned it. All I can find is the information from 2 years ago where they were just talking about it and thinking of getting hunters to do it. I do remember that a couple of the qualifications for the hunters were that they had to pass a shooting test, along with being very physical fit. Then then didn't even get to keep all the meat, the article said that they only got around 60lbs or so.
Back in the late 50"s California set the first hunt for Tule Elk. My Dad drew bull permit #1. The Calif F & G set up the hunt in a way that I could envision hunts being conducted in NPs.

There was a mandatory meeting of all hunters to go over all the rules. Then mandatory range time to prove you could accurately shoot. Then my Dad was assigned an area and a biologist who a went with us (I went as an observer.) The biologist was out "guide" . My Dad shot a nice 6x6 bull within an hour. We were helped getting the animal processed and out of the area. Every hunter was handled the same way.

I could imagine a hunt of this type at Rocky Mt NP and I would be willing to pay maybe $1000 to 1500 for the permit. I could easily see 500 elk or more taken. Would be a money maker too.
 
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kidoggy

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Back in the late 50"s California set the first hunt for Tule Elk. My Dad drew bull permit #1. The Calif F & G set up the hunt in a way that I could envision hunts being conducted in NPs.

There was a mandatory meeting of all hunters to go over all the rules. Then mandatory range time to prove you could accurately shoot. Then my Dad was assigned an area and a biologist who a went with us (I went as an observer.) The biologist was out "guide" . My Dad shot a nice 6x6 bull within an hour. We were helped getting the animal processed and out of the area. Every hunter was handled the same way.

I could imagine a hunt of this type at Rocky Mt NP and I would be willing to pay maybe $1000 to 1500 for the permit. I could easily see 500 elk or more taken. Would be a money maker too.
and that is only what you are willing to pay , they could probably get 5 to 10 times that amount for each animal. maybe not for the females/nannies ????? but even that would not shock me . there is no end to what folks will pay to do what they wish to do.
 
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CrimsonArrow

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Feb 21, 2011
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Back in the late 50"s California set the first hunt for Tule Elk. My Dad drew bull permit #1. The Calif F & G set up the hunt in a way that I could envision hunts being conducted in NPs.

There was a mandatory meeting of all hunters to go over all the rules. Then mandatory range time to prove you could accurately shoot. Then my Dad was assigned an area and a biologist who a went with us (I went as an observer.) The biologist was out "guide" . My Dad shot a nice 6x6 bull within an hour. We were helped getting the animal processed and out of the area. Every hunter was handled the same way.

I could imagine a hunt of this type at Rocky Mt NP and I would be willing to pay maybe $1000 to 1500 for the permit. I could easily see 500 elk or more taken. Would be a money maker too.
Theodore Roosevelt National Park did a cow elk hunt a few years ago to thin numbers. We applied, but did not draw. Operated much the same way, rifle only, and a biologist leads the group out and tells each shooter which elk to kill. It’s a shoot, not a hunt, but the meat would have been nice. I don’t remember if there was a fee, if there was, it was minimal.
 

Colorado Cowboy

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Theodore Roosevelt National Park did a cow elk hunt a few years ago to thin numbers. We applied, but did not draw. Operated much the same way, rifle only, and a biologist leads the group out and tells each shooter which elk to kill. It’s a shoot, not a hunt, but the meat would have been nice. I don’t remember if there was a fee, if there was, it was minimal.
Better to let real hunters pay to take an animal rather than pay shooters to do it!
 

HuskyMusky

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Nov 29, 2011
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PS- if they were really worried about rifle hunters in NP, they could allow bow hunters the opportunity first at least...

lots of better options, to start at least... before paying shooters.