Idaho extends wolf seasons in some units

meathunter

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Jun 6, 2012
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Idaho Falls, Idaho
Idaho F&G extended the wolf seasons in some units, although these won't show in the regs. A lot of units only by a month that were through March 31st are now ending April 30th. Units 21 and 28, which I hunt will be open until June 30th, yay! Getting a wolf is on my bucket list. Looks like this is effective for the 2018 season. At least a positive step in reducing their numbers.
 

nv-hunter

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Feb 28, 2011
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Reno
This is on my bucket list too. What kind of regs are there on wolves? Electronic calls yes/ no? that type info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

Idhikker

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Feb 13, 2018
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They could make the seasons in the whole state yearlong and they still wouldn't kill enough. Lots of wolves and they're harder than heck to kill.
 

kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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if I were still a young man and in better health. I would kill one every year.

it would require a ten mile hike in on snowshoes or cross country skis and at least one over night stay in temps any where from 20 to -20.

I enjoyed doing such things in my youth but now, the spirit is willing but the body is weak
 
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lang

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Nov 11, 2013
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Everyone needs to read up on The Foundation for Wildlife Management. It's a group from North Idaho that realized pretty early that trapping was the only way to really have an impact on wolf numbers. Secondly that the guys that were willing to do it couldn't afford it. The Foundation has the backing of the Idaho FG and RMEF. It is a great program that reimburses you for hunting costs. It has been growing yearly in terms of reimbursement, units, and seasons. Guys looking to hunt wolves might make this more than just a bucket list item if you can get some of the costs covered.
https://www.foundationforwildlifemanagement.org/
 

kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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F&G commission increases number of wolf tags hunters and trappers can purchase
By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, January 28, 2020 - 10:19 AM MST

Up to 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags can now be purchased by individual in a year
During their meeting in Boise on Jan. 23, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to increase the maximum number of wolf tags an individual can purchase to 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags for the 2020-21 season.
The changes to the allowable tag numbers for wolves applies statewide, simplifying the wolf hunting and trapping seasons and rules.

IDFG
While these changes take effect immediately, hunters and trappers should note that they will not be reflected in the current edition of the Idaho Big Game 2019-20 Seasons and Rules brochure, but will be updated online and later in print.
Hunting harvest rates on gray wolves are generally very low. In 2019, more than 45,000 wolf tags were sold in Idaho, and hunters harvested 188 wolves — a success rate of 0.4 percent.
Success rates tend to be slightly higher for trapping, and trappers harvested more wolves (200) than hunters did in 2019. There were only five people in Idaho in 2019 who harvested more than 10 wolves each, which included hunting and trapping.
Prior to the change, the statewide hunter harvest limit was five wolves per calendar year, and hunters could take an additional five wolves in the Panhandle, Clearwater, Upper Snake, and Salmon regions.
The statewide trapper harvest limit was also five wolves per trapping season, and an additional five wolves could be trapped in the Panhandle, Clearwater, Upper Snake, and Salmon regions.
 

Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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I'm struck by low success rates; I know very little about predator hunting, so my impression isn't at all meant in a negative/smart @$$ way.

I guess wolves are just really hard to hunt. Anyone know if that's always been the case, even in Pioneer and Native American days?
 
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kidoggy

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I'm struck by low success rates; I know very little about predator hunting, so my impression isn't at all meant in a negative/smart @$$ way.

I guess wolves are just really hard to hunt. Anyone know if that's always been the case, even in Pioneer and Native American days?
unless one just happens to stumble across one , it does require some commitment and effort . I don't think there are many who actually actively hunt them. most just carry a "just in case" tag. that is all I do. if I stumble across one , I will kill it but I ain't interested enough in killing one, to go out of my way to do so.


calling and trapping are probably the most effective ways to success but both require more effort then most are willing to put out. and from what I have been told by some who do it, they are not really any tougher to call then a coyote, other then the fact that they are not as wide spread as coyotes are . can't call one in unless you are where they can actually hear you . same goes for trapping . can't trap what isn't around.

believe it or not, though we are overrun with wolves , there simply is not a wolf in every drainage .





I know WHERE to find them, relatively close to home, when they are prime but it would require a ten mile snowshoe hike or cross country skiing, in a couple feet of snow and most likely a night or two in sub zero temps. it just isn't worth the effort to me or most people. if it were , I have no doubt I could call one in every year but it simply isn't .


there is only a handful or so of hunters who have killed more then 10 in 2019. they are the ones who actually put out effort
 
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Prerylyon

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Interesting stuff.

A few recent years back, IIRC, a couple were actually killed by coyote hunters here in Iowa.

DNR surmised they came down from MN or WI.

The hunters knew they killed something way bigger that a 'yote and took the carcasses to the DNR, where they were positively ID'd.

Apparently, they're protected here, but those hunters weren't fined, I guess since they were the 1st confirmed wolves in ages around here and since they were cooperative. However, the DNR made it clear in the media that there were no more free passes on mistaken wolf kills and had some hunter educational info campaigns on how to ID wolves vs coyotes.

So, your point about them being hunted similar to coyotes makes sense to me.

I suspect once farmers start losing livestock, Iowa will have a season eventually, maybe in my lifetime. They have plenty of deer to eat. Nothing to stop them from setting up shop here.

Pumas, on the other hand, have no status here in Iowa and can be killed by any legal means of take.
 
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kidoggy

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if wolf pops fall to far ,feds will take over management. nothing good can come of that.

 

Prerylyon

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if wolf pops fall to far ,feds will take over management. nothing good can come of that.

It appears there's way over 15 breeding pairs currently, if I read that link and others more recent correctly; so the ball is in our court. Would it be correct to say this is 'the good ole days of wolf hunting' in Idaho? Bittersweet, as it is though; some of those links showed the expected higher rates of livestock and elk predation in the areas with more wolves.

As a side note, we're pretty sure we found tracks last November in WY's Bighorns while deer hunting.
 
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kidoggy

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It appears there's way over 15 breeding pairs currently, if I read that link and others more recent correctly; so the ball is in our court. Would it be correct to say this is 'the good ole days of wolf hunting' in Idaho? Bittersweet, as it is though; some of those links showed the expected higher rates of livestock and elk predation in the areas with more wolves.

As a side note, we're pretty sure we found tracks last November in WY's Bighorns while deer hunting.
yes ,way over 15 breeding pairs. not sure what this years estimates are.


hunting is good for those willing to put out effort. and yes , in some areas ,the elk have been decimated . in ALL areas , where wolves exist , the herd habits have changed .

not saying there are no elk. just that opportunity has dropped .
a good hunter who can adapt to the changes can still find success year after year .



I see track quite often but have only seen wolves perhaps 20 or so times with the majority of those encounters being back before there was a season on them.

the few times since , I have not yet had an opportunity to kill one . it will happen one day.
 
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