Weather conditions as it relates to the calendar, elevation and state?

280ackimp

Member
Jul 4, 2017
143
6
New Hampshire
Ive been trying to get a handle on weather/climate conditions for my next planned hunt and this has brought up a bunch of questions for me. I have hunted in Wyoming unit 60 over the past years (30) and always hunted the openers. I am planning a late season hunt for the last 8 days of the season in a few years as long as the tag gods are kind. While I have seen and hunted in the rut (Sept 10th +) and hunted the tail end- immediately after the rut (Sept 20th +) I am not sure what to expect for weather adding another 30 days of time for this area ? I also am gambling that the migration would be started or that the younger females will be in season this late and get some post rut -rut activity? What do you think this late season hunt would "likely" bring for weather and what tactics should I prepare for if the migration is not yet in progress or has past ?
Thank you !
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
4,370
1,745
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Gypsum, Co
Weather is always a crap shoot no matter what time of year you schedule for your hunt.

I have seen areas that are dryer than popcorn farts in September and then then next year have 3 feet of snow.

All you can do is to cross your fingers, hope for the best, and plan for the worst.
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
4,370
1,745
67
Gypsum, Co
I hit the enter button before I was ready.

the same can be said for migrations into and out of units. As for breeding it will usually stay at the same time year in and year out.
 

taskswap

Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
325
181
Colorado
Three years ago, Colorado was so dry that I did a quick camping trip at 9500' on Jan 2. I remember we joked that it was both the last and first trips of the season because of the date. Three days later a blizzard hit where we had been and dropped a foot of snow.

Last year Elk Rifle 1 (Oct 10-14) we were camped at 8800' or so and the overnight temp was 9degF. We were pretty well equipped but it was still miserable because the spot where we were was in a temperature inversion so not only was it cold but it was damp from settling moisture in that valley. By the 12th or 13th it was back up to the 30s and we were kicking off blankets all night. All in three days.

To be honest, in the mountains I don't even bother to plan more than a few days ahead. The most accurate thing you can say is "it's generally colder."

As for the migrations don't forget there are two kinds of elk: migratory herds and resident herds. Resident herds often make regular circuits of familiar territory no matter what the weather. Migratory herds will stick it out until they literally have no choice but to go down, and there are plenty of stories of them going back UP if the weather improves.