Ultralight sleeping bags?

Montana

Veteran member
Nov 3, 2011
1,085
356
Bitterroot Valley, MT.
Jumping in here... I would take a peek at Big Agnes bags. Their system is top notch IMO. Like I said, I just jumped in real quick, didn't read all the posts, someone may have already recommended.

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JMSZ

Active Member
Sep 5, 2012
378
0
I finally got a down bag, a Marmot Sawtooth 16 on sale at REI. I already have a Snugpak Special Forces 2 2-part system. The heavier bag is rated for 15 or so degrees and weighs about 4lbs, the lighter bag is rated for 45 degrees and weighs about 3 pounds.

The Marmot is rated for 16 degrees and weighs 2lbs 10.5oz (according to Marmot), so I get the temp rating of the heavier Snugpak bag with weight less than the lighter Snugpak bag. I ended up buying a long wide, the long and regulars weigh a little less. The long wide is perfect for me, I like to be able to roll around, which it allows, but it's not so big it's drafty.

Just for anybody interested, I tried out an REI Igneo bag, it's rated for like 15 degrees and weighs just under 2lbs, but they save some of the weight by making the leg area so small that I couldn't spread my legs at all. It was to the point it was uncomfortable. Smaller people may not have as much of an issue with it if really want to save weight.
 

packer58

Very Active Member
Aug 24, 2011
945
0
Loma Rica, Ca.
Looking to upgrade my older "heavier" sleep system. Iv'e got my eye on the BA Mystic UL 15* / 850 Downtek. Anyone have first hand experience with this bag in the colder temps......Lets say mid teens to low twenty's ?

Campsaver has this bag on sale right now for $399
 

JasonGNV

Very Active Member
Jul 17, 2013
864
0
Smith
I'm following this thread and I'm keeping tabs. I've used several bags over the years, the last is a Dlumberjack guide series bag rated at 30*. It's been great and with some layering I've been warm in colder temps. It's extremely light and compresses down to a 8x8 ball. I've put several years in it and take extremely good care of my bags. BA is what I'm looking at but any of the well known backpacking/mountaineering companies are gonna have quality gear. I'm not sold on the hunting industry gear, especially with the price tags they carry.
 

mntnguide

Very Active Member
Im very satisfied so far with my Northface Superlight bag i got a little over a month ago. Already been in the hills with it quite a bit helping out a friend with some bear hunts, and doing some hunting of my own. The temps were dropping down into the 20s and with just lite layers that i would sleep with normally in any sleeping bag, I never got cold. . That and it weighs just over 1 lb...its pretty awesome, cant wait to be packing it around looking for big bucks in the Wyoming high country soon. . Only thing I will add is a lightweight dry compression sack just to make sure it is staying dry if im caught in a storm with it in the pack. . Price tag...ya its a bit high, but I wont be buying another bag for many years with this one. And for a Mummy, i was surprised how well it felt for me to stretch out in it, I usually go crazy in mummies, but have no issues with this one. I did go for the Long size just to give me a little extra space for stuffing clothes in etc..once the temps really drop
 

bowrunner

Active Member
Oct 13, 2015
299
9
Illinois
Looking to upgrade my older "heavier" sleep system. Iv'e got my eye on the BA Mystic UL 15* / 850 Downtek. Anyone have first hand experience with this bag in the colder temps......Lets say mid teens to low twenty's ?

Campsaver has this bag on sale right now for $399
I really dont think there is a need to spend that much on a sleeping bag. There are a lot of great options. Anything from REI is great. This one looks like a good deal on a Kelty.

https://www.rei.com/product/106147/kelty-cosmic-down-21-sleeping-bag

I use a cabelas xpg backpacker bad as my go to. I dont see it on their website, but this looks comparable to what I have...

http://www.cabelas.com/product/camping/sleeping-bags|/pc/104795280/c/104770080/cabela-s-getaway-15-deg-f-mummy-sleeping-bag/2221066.uts?destination=/catalog/browse/sleeping-bags/cabelas/_/N-1100675+1000002949+4294388681/Ne-1000002949?WTz_st=GuidedNav&WTz_stype=GNU


You need to decide between down or synthetic... you cant go wrong with either, you just have to know how to maintain them individually.
 
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ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
6,474
1,170
www.eastmans.com
Without writing a dissertation I will attempt to recap the bags I have used, or the people in the office have used.

Western Mountaineering Badger MF- I have used and abused mine, temperature rating is spot on.

KUIU- Brandon has used his for two years now and loves it. The treated down works very well.

Montbell Spiral Down Hugger- cool design that keeps the down in place. Dan Pickar has used and abused this one for two years.

Kifaru Slick Bag- I have used this one quite a bit, pretty close to true temp rating. The new models with the climashield insulation is truer to temp than my bag.

Big Agnes- Ike uses the Q-Core pad with their bag with open bottom that you slide the pad in. Treated down as well, good choice and pretty light weight.

Is this something we should tackle in a review?


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DRUSS

Active Member
Jun 22, 2014
409
55
nw oregon
I think this would be a good review topic. I was down to the kifaru,western mountaineering,and the kuiu. I chose the kuiu on the last sale. we will see how it treats me this season.
 

wileywapiti

New Member
Feb 21, 2011
48
0
gods country
I really dont think there is a need to spend that much on a sleeping bag. There are a lot of great options. Anything from REI is great. This one looks like a good deal on a Kelty.
Bowrunner, with all due respect I couldn't disagree more with your statement. I spend all summer and fall in the backcountry of Wyoming (9-14,000') and I can tell you with 110% truth there is a difference between a $150 bag and a $600 bag and there is a need for the $600 bag. When you're carrying pounds on your back weight/warmth ratio is vital, which is the fill weight (550 compare to 850). Would you want 550 strands of insulation per square inch in your house or 850 strands?), but yes you are correct, if your a truck hunter then no need to spend a ton on a down bag, get a big heavy synthetic.

Also, not all people are of average to small size and cant fit into a mummy style bag. So, while the mummy saves weight not all people can fit in them and get an ounce of sleep. I for one am one of those people. Im 6'2" and 250 pounds...not fat, I work out everyday. I don't have room to get my shoulders inside the bag and then move my arms around.

So, there is a need for those types of bags...but not all people need them.
 
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Laddy

Member
Nov 19, 2013
93
1
Idaho
Bowrunner, with all due respect I couldn't disagree more with your statement. I spend all summer and fall in the backcountry of Wyoming (9-14,000') and I can tell you with 110% truth there is a difference between a $150 bag and a $600 bag and there is a need for the $600 bag. When you're carrying pounds on your back weight/warmth ratio is vital, which is the fill weight (550 compare to 850). Would you want 550 strands of insulation per square inch in your house or 850 strands?), but yes you are correct, if your a truck hunter then no need to spend a ton on a down bag, get a big heavy synthetic.

Also, not all people are of average to small size and cant fit into a mummy style bag. So, while the mummy saves weight not all people can fit in them and get an ounce of sleep. I for one am one of those people. Im 6'2" and 250 pounds...not fat, I work out everyday. I don't have room to get my shoulders inside the bag and then move my arms around.

So, there is a need for those types of bags...but not all people need them.
I'll continue that sentiment....

If you're truck hunting, buy a synthetic bag regardless of size and weight. I bought a zero degree bag from cabelas which weights five pounds or so and its great.

If you're back country counting-every-ounce, buy a quality down bag + a sleeping pad which is insulated--THE most overlooked item, and one which adds tremendous comfort. I'd rather spend $200 on an insulated sleeping pad and $100 on a cheap bag, than the other way around. When I made the switch from a a standard thermarest, to their insulated UL it was night and day in warmth. I've since switched to a big Agnes insulated Q Core and its the best pad I've ever owned, and I'd say I've owned close to 20 over my years of hunting and back packing.
 

laxwyo

Very Active Member
I'll agree, I had that thermarest auto inflating pad and it didn't cut it. I'd feel rocks and I thought something was wrong with my sleeping bag because I was chilled even though it's a 20 degree down marmot. I bought the Exped Winterlite Synmat and my sleeping surface was much more comfortable along with being a warmer sleep


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COLOelkman

Member
Mar 12, 2011
81
3
Lakewood, CO
Quick comment on stuff sacks vs compression bags. My quilt had a stuff sack that just barely fits the bag so it's not extra big and seems to be designed to minimize excess weight. To save a little more space, I bought a couple long velcro straps at Home Depot so if I'm trying to reduce space, I can scrunch it down even more and saves weight compared to the compression bags that I have. Compression bags will weigh more due to extra buckles and straps so if you're wanting to reduce weight very cheaply, you might think about this.
 

P Y Buck

New Member
Jun 20, 2019
8
0
Not a fan of a mummy bag.
Has anyone tried the Kifaru slick bag? I like the Big Agnes feature of the pad attaching to the bag, But I like the wider version semi mummy bag that Kifaru offers.
Wish I could find something with the quality of the Kifaru bag but with the feature of being able to attach the pad to the bag like the Big Agnes.
Does anyone have any homemade remedies of attaching the pad to the bag?