The 1 Thing You Learned- Cooking Wild Game

If I am near a garden hose I will hose it off to get any loose hairs or any dirt that may be on the meat. I'll then let it dry before wrapping it up.

When I am antelope hunting I pack a extra 5 gallons of water in my truck just to wash off the animal once I am done skinning it.

If I am not near a lot of water wet rags will also work, it just takes a little bit longer.

I have never lost any meat by doing it this way. I wonder at times when I see a animal being hauled out of the hills in the back of a dusty truck where all the dust and dirt can get all over the body cavity and then they wonder why the meat taste like crap.
You make the case for boning out an animal if you have to haul it out from somewhere that could be a long dirty trip
 
Most of the big game animals I kill are whitetails. I have a wagon that I can normally pull up to a deer really close with my ATV. I take it back to the cabin where I will gut it and then I will immediately wash out with a hose and then hang on the deer pole.

Dad was an steel mill iron worker. He built the wagon in the picture at work during a "slow" time lol.

View attachment 34209

Not a great pic of the meat pole. Dad took a 4 inch piece of channel and welded a bunch of u-bolts to it. At one time the pole could hold about 15 deer. We ended up having to tear down the old meat pole for the cabin build. We ended up cutting the channel in half when we rebuilt it. We don't have near the hunters using it anymore (most have passed away). Mom added a swing a couple years later(chain on left).
View attachment 34210
Wow you have got a sweet set up!
 
I started carrying water for cleaning antelope quarters back at the truck this fall and I'm never going back! Much cleaner meat in the long run, and helps with the cooling process too.
You can never have too much water when you're camped out in antelope country. One tip is to freeze your water in big jugs. These will serve as your ice for most of the trip, then pull double duty when you can drink it as it melts
 

JimP

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If you wash it and then don't let it dry it will start the bacteria growing. In the slaughter houses they control the temperatures and it is usually cool enough that they don't have to worry about it.

But I have washed off and cleaned out the body cavity of gut shot animals with water and then hung them up with zero problems. It is just the big thing that you need to allow them to dry before putting that game bag on unless the bag lets it breath.
 
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JimP

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You can never have too much water when you're camped out in antelope country. One tip is to freeze your water in big jugs. These will serve as your ice for most of the trip, then pull double duty when you can drink it as it melts
On freezing water jugs look at what fits into your coolers. I like 1 quart bottles. they lay down in my coolers quite nicely and if needed you can place them into the body cavity of a animal to cool it off. Also pieces of 1/2" pvc pipe cut to the width of your cooler and then using them to separate the layers of meat will help in allowing air to circulate a little between the layers to help cool things off.
 
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nv-hunter

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If you were to keep it moist and not cooled it would start bacteria really fast. Rinse dry cool last too can happen at the same time if you have good air flow around the carcass.
If you don't have extra water hang it and as it starts to dry those loose hairs will almost just brush off.
 
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If you wash it and then don't let it dry it will start the bacteria growing. In the slaughter houses they control the temperatures and it is usually cool enough that they don't have to worry about it.

But I have washed off and cleaned out the body cavity of gut shot animals with water and then hung them up with zero problems. It is just the big thing that you need to allow them to dry before putting that game bag on unless the bag lets it breath.
Thanks for explaining the distinction between where bacteria comes from grid sounds like it's fine to get the carcass wet, but it's critical to then get it dry. If you had the animal hanging in your shop, I wonder if you could use a fan to blow over the carcass and dry out?
 
On freezing water jugs look at what fits into your coolers. I like 1 quart bottles. they lay down in my coolers quite nicely and if needed you can place them into the body cavity of a animal to cool it off. Also pieces of 1/2" pvc pipe cut to the width of your cooler and then using them to separate the layers of meat will help in allowing air to circulate a little between the layers to help cool things off.
Terrific idea about the PVC spacers. After reading all of these threads, it's beginning to sound like the most important thing to do regarding meat care is keep it dry with good air circulation