tent or bivy?

kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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recently bought an exo 3500 pack and an now looking to get a lightweight tent or possibly bivy .

thinking just for one man, quality three season . has to be light weight and compact. 5lbs or so????lbs = pain.;)

be willing to spend $300 or so but would really like to keep price down IF able and still have something that will last.
was wondering if any experience backpack hunters had any recommendations.


for those who have tried the bivies , how do you like them/ what do you do with packs/guns at night when raining out?
in past , I have simply packed plastic roll and rolled up in that when wet out. getting old and tired of spending miserable nights out in the damp, without good gear.
 
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ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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Without going full review....

Take a look at what Seek Outside and Hilleberg have to offer. They are very different, but you should be able to find something in their line up that meets all of what you are looking at doing.
 

280ackimp

Member
Jul 4, 2017
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New Hampshire
Check out NEMO equipment, they have some pole less designs for backpacking weight tents.
Ive also been eyeing Tentsile tree tents they are tents anchored in 3 locations with a ratchet system to eliminate the sag normally associated with hammock tents.
 

kidoggy

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Check out NEMO equipment, they have some pole less designs for backpacking weight tents.
Ive also been eyeing Tentsile tree tents they are tents anchored in 3 locations with a ratchet system to eliminate the sag normally associated with hammock tents.
yeah ,been looking at them , like the lightweight . not really a fan of the trekking pole setup though.

might be ok for hiking camping but when hunting I am not gonna pack poles with me.

the bivys intrigue me but I also like the idea of having my gear in tent with me.
 

Fink

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Apr 7, 2011
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I've got a Big Agnes Fly Creek UL1. I guess it kinda bridges the gap between tent and bivy. It is small, and light. Has just enough room in the vestibule that I can get my pack and boots in there. I think it weighs about 2 pounds total. I've been pleased with the quality of mine. I think you have to baby it to make it last (same with any ultra lite gear).
It should be about in your price range.
 

Timr245

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Jul 21, 2016
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Im watching this thread closely as I too am looking for a spike tent. Gotta tell ya, the Big Agnes Fly Creek looks perfect. Price and weight, seems like a great buy.
 

kidoggy

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maybe the nemo hornet???or one from the agnes line???? still looking no hurry ,I have time.


I like the bivys ,IF, the weather was always fair. not to sure about them when it's nasty out though. think I may just go for a tent with the small weight difference


the only airframe I have seen so far ,I don't much care for, other then it is light and packs away to virtually nothing.
 
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280ackimp

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Jul 4, 2017
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New Hampshire
Have you seen the Tentsile, tree tents that are triangular and use ratchets for tensioning and this eliminates the sag with hammock tents ...I think the solo version is under 5 pounds and at $250. They should make camping on slopes a lot easier.
 

kidoggy

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Have you seen the Tentsile, tree tents that are triangular and use ratchets for tensioning and this eliminates the sag with hammock tents ...I think the solo version is under 5 pounds and at $250. They should make camping on slopes a lot easier.
I haven't. thanks ,will give them a look.
 

RICMIC

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Feb 21, 2012
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This is above your price point, but I can't say enough good things about my KUIU 2P tent. It has held up to 40MPH wind, 10" snow, overweight camp partners, etc. It is like a motel room to sleep solo in. It weighs 3# 3 oz. w/o the footprint. I just added a piece of used Tyvek. From what I have seen the Big Agnes UL2 would be a good option for you. I would find a place where you could see one all set up...a great companion piece is the Thermarest NeoAir XTherm pad.
 

gonhunting247

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Jan 21, 2014
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I've used a 3 season XPG 2 man tent on all my back pack hunts. It's probably not a match for the Hilleberg or the KUIU etc., but for about half the price it's served me well. It's been to AK on sheep and goat hunts and performed well. I went with the 2 man because I like my gear inside and a little more room. The weight is really minimal, but I can't remember how much exactly. I've had it for a long time, so not even sure they still make them. Might be worth looking into, for a lower price option though. Good luck!
 

taskswap

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Jul 9, 2018
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Yeah I think it depends really on where you're going and what season. Higher altitudes have faster weather changes than low ones, and so you need more gear to be safe and comfortable. And earlier seasons need a lot less. When I'm backpacking in warmer weather (like archery season) I like a hammock and tarp setup. All I need for comfort is a thin bag and altogether the whole setup only weighs a few pounds. But it's totally not suitable for any kind of wind or weather.

Also, fire risk is a big factor. I see a ton of Youtube videos guys post about how they set up their tarps or whatever to catch heat from fires to stay comfortable all night. But I camp in Colorado, where "drown it out" is the rigid rule and you'd NEVER dig a fire down into the ground or those other tricks because of the risk of smoldering root systems. Leaving a fire going here while you're sleeping is criminally irresponsible, so you need more insulation to make up for it.

I don't know what your goals are here, but my totally subjective 2c is that I'd spend more time thinking through the ground pad than any other gear. That ends up being your most important insulation layer a lot of the time, and if you can't lie comfortably on it, or it weighs 6lbs, you're not gonna have a good time!
 

kidoggy

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I have a pretty good ground pad . can't remember off hand what brand but it serves me well.
 

Work2hunt

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Big agnes copper spur ul2... lightweight, awesome tent for 1 and room for gear to stay out of the weather. Ive beat the hell out of mine for 3 years now

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
+1 on the BA Copper Spur UL2. I've used mine a couple different seasons. All September to mid October with no issues.
 

kidoggy

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I've used a 3 season XPG 2 man tent on all my back pack hunts. It's probably not a match for the Hilleberg or the KUIU etc., but for about half the price it's served me well. It's been to AK on sheep and goat hunts and performed well. I went with the 2 man because I like my gear inside and a little more room. The weight is really minimal, but I can't remember how much exactly. I've had it for a long time, so not even sure they still make them. Might be worth looking into, for a lower price option though. Good luck!
cabelas is sold out of the xpg2p right now.. am going to give it a closer look when they restock. says it's only 3-4 pounds with footprint
 

kidoggy

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here's an odd thought that came to me while checking out tents.

when lightning is in area ,obviously you don't want to be the highest point around . was wondering are carbon poles less apt to be hit then aluminum.


have been in a few high country storms and they are not conducive to clean shorts .

what do you do when in the backwoods and storm strikes . do you leave the shelter from the elements of the tent or just pray for mercy?
 

mntnguide

Very Active Member
Aluminum is more conductive than carbon...but in all reality, if it really got to that point, it meant you chose a terrible camp site. I always camp below ridgeline and prefer to have taller trees nearby. Electricity seeks the easiest path to ground, which is why it strikes trees so often. Our bodies are made up of so much water %, that we are another good source to ground. Best thing to do is stay as low to the ground as possible such as shrinking up in a ball or laying on the ground. Dont lean up against tall trees etc, but when it comes to the tent, you should plan ahead in terms of where you make camp if you are worried bad weather is coming. Here in Western Wyoming high country, lightning storms are a major thing to worry about and I have retreated down into a basin to avoid danger before.