If you could change your profession, what would it be?

buckbull

Veteran member
Jun 20, 2011
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I'm a software architect for a rather large aerospace company. I really enjoy my job about 90% of time. I design enterprise web applications; mostly in engineering support systems and supplier data management. I actually went to college thinking I would be a mechanical engineer. I did OK from a grades point of view but wasn't learning. How can you get a 38% on a thermodynamics test and get a B and actually know anything. Switched majors to computer science; best decision I have ever made.
 

mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
2,478
1,005
Honestly, I am just sick of working for the man. I am in my mid-30's and if it wasn't for health insurance and my 401K match I would cut grass for a living.

Dealing with moronic project engineers, unreasonable PM's, un-realistic deadlines, small margins, battling change orders and overruns on budgets is starting to drive me out of my mind.

I have invested the last 17 years into a profession that is and always will be the redheaded stepchild of the engineering world. Its no longer rewarding to me. My 1 day of PTO was denied for the 4th of July weekend as well, which I though was real cute.

20 more years and I am DONE. I will no longer answer to any man. I dont care if I have to live in a tent. I am done at 55 and the company will come get thier stuff from my house if they want it.

Hunting and fishing has always been my passion. Unfortunately, it doesn't pay the bills on the east coast.

I should have taken that Oil and Gas job in Gillette WY when I had the chance but I couldn't afford to live there.........That was 13 years ago.
 

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
6,385
1,074
www.eastmans.com
About 6.5 years ago I went from full time youth ministry to work for Eastmans'. We had been looking at the opportunity to do college ministry here in Powell and my wife happened to see this job was available and that I was qualified for it. Having a full time job provides lots of opportunities for time management learning experiences when it comes to making sure I do a good job at everything I am committed to. The change a few years ago was great for us and has been great for starting the family. If you are thinking about a career change it can be a very good thing!
 

HuskyMusky

Veteran member
Nov 29, 2011
1,157
61
IL
I'm there now.... debating more engineering vs... possibly something in finance.

It's kind of the passion/fun/interests vs. Money$$ although numbers and money were always a interest/passion, too.

We'll see...

life gave me some curve balls, feel like 40 going on 25 some days...
 

go_deep

Veteran member
Nov 30, 2014
2,293
1,067
Wyoming
Honestly, I am just sick of working for the man. I am in my mid-30's and if it wasn't for health insurance and my 401K match I would cut grass for a living.

Dealing with moronic project engineers, unreasonable PM's, un-realistic deadlines, small margins, battling change orders and overruns on budgets is starting to drive me out of my mind.

I have invested the last 17 years into a profession that is and always will be the redheaded stepchild of the engineering world. Its no longer rewarding to me. My 1 day of PTO was denied for the 4th of July weekend as well, which I though was real cute.

20 more years and I am DONE. I will no longer answer to any man. I dont care if I have to live in a tent. I am done at 55 and the company will come get thier stuff from my house if they want it.

Hunting and fishing has always been my passion. Unfortunately, it doesn't pay the bills on the east coast.

I should have taken that Oil and Gas job in Gillette WY when I had the chance but I couldn't afford to live there.........That was 13 years ago.
Life's to short, you got to find something better for yourself.
 
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Mr Drysdale

Active Member
Mar 24, 2013
248
51
Started out pumping gas and fixing flats at 18 and married. Went from that to selling auto parts to selling cars to management and then the place went under. Banker friend called and said he needed help. I had to borrow a sports jacket from my brother-in-law to interview. That was 36 years ago this month. Changed banks 28 years ago and now am on the Board of Directors and in Senior Management. I feel very blessed and enjoy my profession.
 

dan maule

Very Active Member
Jan 3, 2015
568
360
Upper Michigan
I made a career change 2 years ago. I spent about 24 years working in management at a Paper Mill holding many different positions over the years. I had an opportunity to switch to basically a consultant for a chemical company servicing the Paper Mills in the area. While it has turned out to be a great decision, I would really like to own and operate a sporting goods store. Sitting around talking about guns all day is right up my alley. I realize that there is much more to operating a retail business than that, but it's my dream and I only want to focus on the positives.
 
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Colorado Cowboy

Veteran member
Jun 8, 2011
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Dolores, Colorado
I made a career change 2 years ago. I spent about 24 years working in management at a Paper Mill holding many different positions over the years. I had an opportunity to switch to basically a consultant for a chemical company servicing the Paper Mills in the area. While it has turned out to be a great decision, I would really like to own and operate a sporting goods store. Sitting around talking about guns all day is right up my alley. I realize that there is much more to operating a retail business than that, but it's my dream and I only want to focus on the positives.
My Dad owned a gun shop many years ago. In my opinion you need to offer more than any of the big box stores. The biggest problem around here is finding a good gunsmith. If a gun shop owner could offer the space for a 'smith to operate out of his shop, I believe you could do well. I know most of the 'smiths have an FFL and sell guns, but they have to do a lot of bookkeeping and it keeps them from working on guns.

Just sayin......................
 
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dan maule

Very Active Member
Jan 3, 2015
568
360
Upper Michigan
My Dad owned a gun shop many years ago. In my opinion you need to offer more than any of the big box stores. The biggest problem around here is finding a good gunsmith. If a gun shop owner could offer the space for a 'smith to operate out of his shop, I believe you could do well. I know most of the 'smiths have an FFL and sell guns, but they have to do a lot of bookkeeping and it keeps them from working on guns.

Just sayin......................
I got an FFL as soon as I turned 21 hoping someday to open a shop. During the Clinton administration the ATF started increasing the requirements and after 3 years when it came time to renew my license I let it go. They pretty much scared me out of it, a decision I have regretted ever since. Anyway, it is almost impossible to compete with the big boys on pricing when it comes to firearms. You really need to offer something unique like you mentioned. Either gunsmithing or something custom that resonates with your local community.
 

mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
2,478
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I also really wanted to be a gunsmith when I was young.
Where I grew up people were pretty much dirt poor. Jobs were scarce and people were not willing to pay for gunsmith services.

How do you charge someone $150 to drill and tap for a scope when the gun only costs $300? lol
Guns are not cars, people dont NEED them. They can let them sit there until they have the extra cash to pick them up. To me that just isn't a reliable source of income. I have drilled and tapped several guns for friends over the years on my friends Bridgeport mill. Its costs them a case of beer. ha!

I have thought about a Tire shop. God knows there's lots of money in tires and people need them.

Bottom line is that when a person is used to making good money its hard to chase a passion that doesn't pay the bills let alone save for retirement.
 
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Colorado Cowboy

Veteran member
Jun 8, 2011
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Dolores, Colorado
I also really wanted to be a gunsmith when I was young.
Bottom line is that when a person is used to making good money its hard to chase a passion that doesn't pay the bills let alone save for retirement.
That's why young retirees often keep working doing "their passion". I did a lot of leather work, stock making and and making knives after I retired.
 

WY ME

Very Active Member
Feb 4, 2014
537
28
Wyoming
In my past life I was a fur buyer and I loved it, but the stock market crash of '87 (etal) put an end to the fur market, probably forever. My job for the last 20 years has allowed me to see the entire US, CA and much of the world for which I'm thankful for...but it's just a job. I wish I was still buying fur.
 

dan maule

Very Active Member
Jan 3, 2015
568
360
Upper Michigan
In my past life I was a fur buyer and I loved it, but the stock market crash of '87 (etal) put an end to the fur market, probably forever. My job for the last 20 years has allowed me to see the entire US, CA and much of the world for which I'm thankful for...but it's just a job. I wish I was still buying fur.
The early 80s were a great time to be a fur buyer, that's when I first started trapping around 1982. I still cannot believe the prices we got for furs back then compared to now. I bet that job was a blast.