6mm's 6.5mm's

switchbackkd

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Jan 22, 2012
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Im looking into the 6mm and 6.5mm.

What is the benefits of

6mm Rem vs 6mm Creedmoor

260 Rem vs 6.5 Creedmoor

Mainly want it for varmints medium sized games
 

JimP

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Mar 28, 2016
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When I was looking at the 6mm's I went with the .25-06 and never looked back.

Low recoil and long range capability. Plus with the right bullet capable of animals up to and including elk.
 

switchbackkd

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Jan 22, 2012
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I considered a 25-06, 257 Roberts. The issue i ran into them is i couldn't find the rifles. The 260 is making a comeback and 6mm Rem my gun shop has several model 7s. and the creedmoors are everywhere
 

JimP

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Find the style of rifle you like and then have the gun shop order it.

In my opinion the 6.5 Creedmoor is over rated. Another thing you should take into consideration is the availability of ammo, that is unless you reload.
 

Mr Drysdale

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Mar 24, 2013
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The grandchildren and I own/shoot/hunt with the 260 Rem. We have three Model Sevens, one A-Bolt and a 116 Savage. Been using them since 1999. Deadly on Whitetails. Ammo has been plentiful but have saved every piece of brass since the beginning just in case. Mostly shoot the 120 grain but have shot the 140’s and some reloaded 100 grain. As I understand it there is not much difference between the 260 and the 6.5 CM. Hornady has done an awesome job marketing the 6.5 Creed but I will stay with the 260 Rem.
 

Millsworks

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Nov 23, 2017
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Augusta, West Virginia
As already stated, the .260 and the 6.5 creedmore are practically the same in performance.
The 6mm is extremely similar to the .243, but the 6mm creedmore is a bit faster and more efficient than the 6mm.
The 6mm creedmore is still a little too new to have any good info on it though, and I haven't had an opportunity to shoot one yet.
If you reload, the REM. .260 is the more versatile of the cartridges mentioned.
 

Tim McCoy

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Dec 15, 2014
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What you get with the Creedmore case design is a longer neck. Where that is valuable is for loading very long (heavy) for caliber bullets. It was designed for long range competition. 143-147 6.5 pills, 105-107 ish pills in 6mm, or there abouts. I doubt there is an animal that can tell which 6mm got em, or which 6.5. The 6.5CM is likely to end the 260 as a factory cartridge. The 6mm Rem has been basically dead for decades.

Myself, not handloading at this time, if I wanted a 6mm bore, I’d buy a 243 Win, if I wanted a 6.5mm, I’d buy the 6.5CM. If the 6mm CM takes hold like the 6.5 did, then it will be viable. The number of 243’s out there suggests to me the 6mm CM is a long shot outside LR competitions. Right now the 6mm CM is too new to call it one way or the other. 10 ish years ago, I bought my youngest son a 260 as his first BG rifle, really wish it was a 6.5 CM now, due to more factory ammo availability...

All that said, my 25-06 is my fav medium game cartridge.
 

mcseal2

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Mar 1, 2011
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I have and use all the bore diameters being discussed.

The 6mm stuff works on medium game just fine but shot angles and bullet choice need careful consideration. I personally use it during antlerless season when I can be picky on shot angles. When hunting bucks that may not give an ideal presentation I personally like a little more horsepower. That said, I don't think it would be likely that a 90gr Nosler E tip or similar Barnes would stay in even a big bodied deer. Where I really like the 6mm stuff is for coyotes at longer ranges or on windy days. I have taken a bunch with a lot of different bullets with great results. A favorite all-purpose bullet is the 90gr Accubond. It puts a reasonably small exit wound on a coyote that doesn't completely wreck the pelt and works excellent on deer. To keep them in a coyote the explosive HP or polymer tip stuff under 70gr seems best. They can still have plenty of pelt damage if you hit bone.

The 25-06 is devastating on coyotes but the bigger fast bullets are hard to keep in one. I personally like a tough bullet from it like the 100gr Swift Scirocco II for deer or coyotes. It exits both with minimal damage but puts them down fast. The 110 Accubond would likely perform similar. I just started trying the new Hornady 110gr ELD-X in mine. It shoots excellent and has a great ballistic coefficient for a 25 caliber bullet. I look forward to playing with it at longer range. I would not hesitate to use the 25-06 on most any shot angle I'd take on a deer with the right bullet. The 25-06 needs some barrel length to perform it's best, at least 24" and more is better.

I am a big 6.5mm fan. I use the 264 win mag for almost all my buck hunting. Both my 264's with 140 or 143gr bullets have been great deer killers at any reasonable range and angle. Not much currently available beats it for amazing ballistics with easy to handle recoil. I'm currently using the 140gr Berger in one, and the 143gr ELD-X in the other. I have used the 140gr Accubond with great results also. I consider any 6.5 overkill for varmints or predators but if you aren't keeping hides they will sure do the job. The 264 also benefits from a longer barrel.

Another new 6.5 that interests me quite a bit is the new 6.5PRC from Hornady. Seekins Precision is chambering their Havak Pro Hunter in this new round and if I was in the market for a 6.5 right now I think I'd save up for that one. It pushes a 140gr bullet over 2900fps from a 24" barrel in a case designed for efficiency, barrel life, and accuracy. The 6.5x284 would be my second choice. I like the extra velocity with heavy bullets over the 6.5 Creedmoor or 260. I know from my 264 shooting I can handle that level of recoil well.
 

switchbackkd

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Jan 22, 2012
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I almost ordered a 264 Win Mag but, the shop had a 26 Nosler on rock bottom deal that one could pass up. I got it because I love my 28 Nosler. But was trying to get something with a little less recoil and power. I shot a deer within 200 yards and the Nosler passed threw with out much expansion.
 

Tim McCoy

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Dec 15, 2014
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Oregon
I almost ordered a 264 Win Mag but, the shop had a 26 Nosler on rock bottom deal that one could pass up. I got it because I love my 28 Nosler. But was trying to get something with a little less recoil and power. I shot a deer within 200 yards and the Nosler passed threw with out much expansion.
What bullet were you using on the deer? At 200 look there, not to the cartridge, for answers.
 

HuskyMusky

Veteran member
Nov 29, 2011
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IL
I don't see the 6mm Creed taking over the .243win.
If you reload I'd probably go 6mm Rem. Ackley Improved

Unless you're really looking for long range and high BC's, which my understanding is they are to out pace velocity at the 500+ yard mark.
Case for case, the larger bore diameter can accomplish the same bullet velocity with less barrel length required.

So instead of the 6.5-06 or 264win.mag, I'd probably just get a 270wsm, or 7mm Rem.Mag. or 270, 280 rem/ai.
 

JimP

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One thing that I have found when people say that the bullets didn't mushroom any is that it is a complete pass through so there is no real evidence of it.

You have to remember that skin streatches and just because there isn't a 5" exit hole doesn't mean that the bullet didn't do its job.

Barnes bullets got a bad rap for this for quite a while. The exit holes were just a little bit larger than the entrance hole and the hunters figured that the bullet didn't perform and mushroom like it should of. But the only evidence was the exit hole that was just slightly larger than the entrance one.

On this picture of the exit hole on my coues deer it doesn't look as large as it should be. The shot was 420 yards with my .25-06 shooting a Barnes 100 grain TTSX at 3200 fps. The deer didn't take a step, he just dropped.