Wyoming Rocks and Glassing

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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Feb 3, 2014
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LOL, that central part of the state has the right geology for it. That is funny, the rock elk can be brutal!
 
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JimP

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Mar 28, 2016
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Gypsum, Co
Chasing elk with the girlfriend the past few days. If I had a quarter for every dang rock here in Unit 7 that looked like an elk.
Right color, right spot, only to watch the sun move a little and nothing. :)
Chasing elk with the girlfriend the past few days. If I had a quarter for every dang rock here in Unit 7 that looked like an elk.
Right color, right spot, only to watch the sun move a little and nothing. :)
A few years ago I watched a rock for 3 or 4 hours just knowing that it had to be a elk. It never moved and when it was time to leave I radioed my partner to pick me up at a different place, I was going to hike over to that rock.

Once I got there I found that it was indeed a elk, a dead one but a elk. It was a 4x4 that was shot during a spike only hunt just a week before. The hunters also had shot a spike and the gut pile was still there along with horse tracks from where they packed out the spike.
 

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
7,419
2,325
www.eastmans.com
A few years ago I watched a rock for 3 or 4 hours just knowing that it had to be a elk. It never moved and when it was time to leave I radioed my partner to pick me up at a different place, I was going to hike over to that rock.

Once I got there I found that it was indeed a elk, a dead one but a elk. It was a 4x4 that was shot during a spike only hunt just a week before. The hunters also had shot a spike and the gut pile was still there along with horse tracks from where they packed out the spike.
Really sad when that stuff happens.
 
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RICMIC

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Feb 21, 2012
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Two Harbors, Minnesota
Since we've taken a swing into the hunting ethics area, here's a situation where I recently had the opportunity to coach three young hunters about making responsible decisions. On my trip to Wyoming with two elk tags in my pocket, a friend had packed me 2 1/2 hours in on horseback to drop me off on top of the mountain. My plan was to hunt the last week of archery (using a crossbow). The GEN was an "any elk" tag, and the limited type 6 was a cow/calf. Along for the ride were 3 pre-teen boys.
Just short of the campsite, we saw a couple elk bedded in the quakies, so we just dropped my gear and made a move on them. We set up a decoy, my bud started some cow calls, and within 15 minutes I had a spike bull on the ground. Bing-badda-boom. With an empty freezer at home and knowing the low odds on an archery tag, I wasn't about to pass on a gift. As we were walking up to the dead bull, we saw a 5x5 that was giving us the stink eye from 600 yards away before he went over the top. I asked the boys what they would do if they had been hunting alone and had a chance to shoot that bull, even with a dead spike on the ground. We discussed what "High Grading" was, and that making ethical decisions really comes into play when you don't have an audience.
I later spent some time trying to fill the cow tag during the rifle season, with no luck, so it looks like I will be headed back o WY in Dec. or Jan. for anther go at it. Of course, I can always shoot one of Slug's rocks.