Let's SEE EM! Arrow Groups!

Stay Sharp

Very Active Member
Oct 6, 2015
807
140
WI
Stay Sharpe,

Not to hijack the thread but how do you recommend sharpening G5 Montecs? As I'm sure you are aware the angle is not conducive to getting them razor sharp. Thoughts?
Its not the angle that's the problem. Its the method people use. They push the head forward and backwards and that puts the abrasion or scratches in the blade edge in the wrong direction for a sharp edge. Couple that with people pushing too hard when they sharpen and the fact that the stainless versions are soft metal (the Carbon steel versions are far better) and you will understand why people get frustrated when trying to sharpen heads like the montecs.

Sharpening them side to side take a bit of practice but you need finer grits and less pressure (= more time to do a good job) and you will get them very sharp.
 

Slugz

Veteran member
Oct 12, 2014
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Woodland Park, Colorado
Its not the angle that's the problem. Its the method people use. They push the head forward and backwards and that puts the abrasion or scratches in the blade edge in the wrong direction for a sharp edge. Couple that with people pushing too hard when they sharpen and the fact that the stainless versions are soft metal (the Carbon steel versions are far better) and you will understand why people get frustrated when trying to sharpen heads like the montecs.

Sharpening them side to side take a bit of practice but you need finer grits and less pressure (= more time to do a good job) and you will get them very sharp.
Interesting.....On a side note I'm a side to side man, light pressure, super fine diamond stone, trying both models of metal and finish on leather. Will continue to refine my technique.......I get em sharper then when they come out of the box....but that ain't saying much IMO......so I shouldn't get hung up on the 60 degree edge on them vice 20 degrees? I can't remember and it doesn't look like they are marked....is the CS the black ones? Thanks appreciate the info.
 

Stay Sharp

Very Active Member
Oct 6, 2015
807
140
WI
Interesting.....On a side note I'm a side to side man, light pressure, super fine diamond stone, trying both models of metal and finish on leather. Will continue to refine my technique.......I get em sharper then when they come out of the box....but that ain't saying much IMO......so I shouldn't get hung up on the 60 degree edge on them vice 20 degrees? I can't remember and it doesn't look like they are marked....is the CS the black ones? Thanks appreciate the info.
Yes the black ones are CS and better than the silver ones. It sounds like you are doing it right. I sharpen broadheads for bowhunters that are sharpening challenged. As a custom knife maker I use ceramic to finish the blades. I can get them shaving sharp.

You are correct about out of the package sharpness. In most cases, its pretty poor. Right now, 3 blade, fixed blade broadheads are very popular. The G5 Montec revived the interest and other broadhead makers have followed suit. All of these heads appear to be top notch, but I can tell you that these heads are not exactly razor sharp right out of the package. Don't get me wrong. All of these heads will do the job straight from the package if you make a well placed shot through the vitals but they can all be improved by a little touch up prior to taking them to the field.

The same is true of a head that you have been using as a practice Broadhead. Foam targets don't really damage a broadhead but they will dull them considerably. In either case, sharpening a 3 bladed broadhead is so easy that there is no real reason to not to give them a touch up that will make them scary sharp.

Sharpening a 3 bladed broadhead is a simple a rolling a toy car on a table top. No special skills are required to produce a sharp, hunting quality edge. You can use something as simple as 400 or 1000 grit wet dry sandpaper. This sandpaper is normally black and is available at all hardware stores and home centers. For longer life I use a flat (fine) diamond hone. You can also use a whet stone. The only other thing you need is a sharpie marker. The sharpie is used to draw in the blade edge. As you sharpen the head, you will wear away the marker and know that you have touched up the entire surface. One thing to keep in mind is that you need to keep your stoke count equal on all 3 sides of the head to maintain balance. If two sides can be honed with only 30 stokes but the 3rd side, requires 40 strokes, all sides must get 40 strokes.



Here is a head I took straight from the package. Notice the grind marks and the rolled over edge (white line along the cutting edge). This head was semi sharp but not one I would take into the woods.



I took another head and spent perhaps 3 minutes on a diamond hone and then an Arkansas stone and then ceramic plate. In very little time, I had the head much sharper. In the upper blade you can see the reflection of the camera lens info. I used the side to side motion rather than front to back.

 

Stay Sharp

Very Active Member
Oct 6, 2015
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This is the sharpness tester I built from a piece of wood and some rubber bands.



I was able to press the first head into the tester without cutting a single band.



The head I sharpened with only a few strokes cut nearly every band it came in contact with.



Here is a video I shot of the diff between the two heads in the sharpness tester.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMRxr5Jhkkw

It takes very little effort to take a new broadhead that is semi sharp and turn it into a head that is more suited for hunting. The duller of the two heads will push tissue out of the way (like the bands) while the sharper head will slice through the material it contacts.
 

Stay Sharp

Very Active Member
Oct 6, 2015
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As I said, I don’t care to shoot groups because arrows are just too expensive. That being said, I was evaluating a new type of fletching we were working on and threw caution to the wind at 70, 80 and 90 yards. It still cost us damage. Here are the videos.

[video=youtube;AJFB9sqp-7I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJFB9sqp-7I[/video]
 

Stay Sharp

Very Active Member
Oct 6, 2015
807
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WI
80 and 90 yards

[video=youtube;BDlNQgND49A]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDlNQgND49A[/video]
 

HuskyMusky

Veteran member
Nov 29, 2011
1,251
123
IL
I wont shoot at the same dot anymore, most of my targets use a 5 dot pattern....

fletching, robin hoods etc... doesn't take long to learn that one.

I had a robin hood at 60yds I think it was? I have the arrow.
 

7shot

Active Member
Mar 26, 2015
177
0
Idaho
I have been shooting 5 days a week. I usually shoot 12 to 20 arrows depending on my shooting, the wind and how hard I lifted weights that day.

Here are 2 three shot groups, one from 90 yards just drifted right. The group from 100 yards was about 3 inches low. It is amazing how wind or heavy air can influence long range bow shooting.

90 yard group.jpg100 yard grouping.jpg
 

marcusvdk

Veteran member
Dec 13, 2011
5,019
1,319
Michigan
Saw my orthopedic surgeon Wednesday and was cleared to go back to work with some restrictions monday. Separated my right shoulder 4 weeks a go. so asked about shoot bow and he said i could do it up to my ability to deal with the discomfort.

So pulled the bow out and shot this group of 5 arrows first at 25 yards. Not bad minus the one lower left stray.


Then i shot 10 more arrows and thats when i noticed i need to stop as my right shoulder (right handed and injured one) was straining holding the weight to shoot. So it got speratic. Had 4 completely miss the target over and to the left that ended up going through the plywood backer and punching holes in my metal shed. One that hit just in front of the target and the rest pretty much hit all four corners. So i learned i need to take it easy 5/6 shots a day to start out till my strength is back.
 

7shot

Active Member
Mar 26, 2015
177
0
Idaho
Ouch !! That is a tough injury just before season - hope it heals quick and you can get the shooting groove back. I have a good friend that had shoulder surgery and it was a few months recovery and rehab before he could get good groups. You are right, just don't over do it. The good thing is you don't need to shoot a group to kill an animal at 25 yards. If you are shooting 4 good ones that is all you need. I have friends that will shoot alot of arrows in a session and then they get shakey and start spraying arrows all over the place and getting into bad habits. I used to do the same. Now I shoot for accuracy and rarely shoot more than 12 arrows in a session. I do other strength training so I can hold the bow back for 2 minutes plus and still shoot well. Best of luck -