E kits, whatcha carrying?

go_deep

Veteran member
Nov 30, 2014
2,592
1,860
Wyoming
Cleaned my pack out tonight and went through my emergency kit and don't really see anything I'm missing, but thought it would be a good topic.33010
Picture is my kit, not pictured is 20' of rope and an extra set of batteries for my headlamp that is also in there.
So what's everyone else is carrying with them?
 

taskswap

Very Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
523
377
Colorado
I carry two kits in Kifaru Ultralight Pullouts, one that fits inside the other. The smaller is my "day kit" and contains:

120dB whistle
3x lithium AAA batteries for my headlamp (it takes 2, but people I hunt with use headlamps that take 3)
2x Steristrip wound closures
2x Sterile Two's (gauze pads)
Foil mylar rescue blanket
3x alcohol prep wipes
3x BZK antiseptic wipes
10 bandaids
2x nitrile gloves
Micro Starflash signal mirror (with sight)
Sharpie with electrical tape on it
Small baggie of mixed OTC meds: aspirin, benadryl, ibuprofen, antacid, simethicone, caffeine
1x prescription anti-nasea, clearly marked for me
4x zip ties
1 cut-down roll of foam heel tape (enough for about 4 tapings - I blister easily)

All of these items are meant to be so light there's zero excuse not to bring them. (The whole kit is 5.5oz, not that I care - I'm an ounce-fiend but there are some things you just don't negotiate.) Note that I do NOT carry all the "recommended" stuff on prepper lists like "three ways to make fire", compass, or extra knives. When I hunt I'm never without at LEAST two blades, typically at least a belt knife and Gerber Dime EDC in my pocket, plus often my field dressing kit. And as for a compass, my day kit is for times I always know where I am, even without a GPS. They're areas I know, that I've almost always been to before, and I don't get lost easily. Besides, as much as we'd love to believe we can "get into the wilderness", in Colorado you need some planning to get somewhere more than a couple miles from a road or private land, and I wouldn't consider those day trips.

In a larger pullout I can stuff the above into, I carry a few extra items when I know I'm going "farther back", "overnight", or "with people I may need to support" including:

CAT tourniquet
2x chemlight sticks (beats spare batteries any day)
Extra foil mylar blanket
Disposable rain poncho
Leg splint/wrap
Compass
Small amount of waxed tinder, a lighter, and a book of matches
Quick Clot
Water purification tablets (just a few, not the whole bottle)
2x Vicodin I never used from a past operation because I don't take that s*** longer than I have to, but if I break my ankle...
More OTC meds in general from the list above
Two more pairs of nitrile gloves
50' of waxed #36 bank line (half the weight of paracord, 320lbs instead of 550 but that's usually still plenty)
2x safety pins
One more set of AAA batteries
Four more "Sterile 2's", and a handful of extra band-aids, steri-strips, BZK wipes, etc.

In my truck I have a full first aid kit with more of the above, an extra tourniquet, a pulse oximeter, a small can of O2, and for whatever reason I got it in my head to add a Hyvent chest seal for that day I hope never happens and there's an accident in camp and I'm dealing with a sucking chest wound.

My wife thinks I'm crazy, and she knows me better than most...
 

kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
8,468
8,748
55
idaho
day packs tend to be slimmed way down to just rope, matches/lighter , super glue ,duct tape(will solve most problems ;) :ROFLMAO: ), alcohol wipes, phone.

WHILE NOT recommended, I figure if for only a day dirt will work as blood clot, in a pinch, IF, it comes to that.
would probably try tearing up a shirt or using a tournequette first but ya gotta do wats ya gotta do.
always have a knife and saw. generally have a botttle of water.


this is my basecamp and backpacking list
phone... when service permits
some rope(tournquette)
bandaids /gauze pad/ cottonballs (if no gauze pad cut up a game bag/old sock/ shirt if you carry any)
whistle
compass
pyrodex pellets and a lighter, flint and matches for blood stop:ROFLMAO: ( just kidding but do carry a couple for emergency fire starting. just grind up , use in small amounts and be careful ;) not recommended for children and idiots! )
quik clot and/or super glue
needle and thread/fishing line for stiches ( duct tape also works in a pinch)

flask of jack daniels. tylenol and/or couple joints for "pain management"
few alchohl wipes ( to disinfect and also the smell will help with nausea
duct tape(solves virtually any problem)
defibrillator( also comes in handy for interrogating fellow hunters for their honey holes):ROFLMAO:(again ,just kidding);)

not part of emerg kit but always have a saw and sharp knife and or leatherman tool when hiking ,in case amputation is required. hopefully it never comes to that. cause you'd probly die ;) and I'd RATHER die.:ROFLMAO:


above I saw sharpie . probly not a bad item to add to document rate of swelling
 
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RICMIC

Veteran member
Feb 21, 2012
1,769
1,380
Two Harbors, Minnesota
I make up emer. kits that are tuned to the trip, time of year, vehicles, etc. Something that a lot of people don't consider is what you should always have in your pockets. I have put my pack down while making a stalk, and had the devil of a time finding it in the dark later, and each year someone falls out of the tree stand and what they needed to call for help is in the pack and in the tree.
1. Lighter; keep it in an inner pocket so it stays warm enough to light.
2. Phone; if you are in an area with cell service.
3. SPOT or InReach; I keep mine in an accessible jacket pocket and remember to move it if it warms up and I remove clothes.
4. Compass, headlamp, pocket knife, fire kit (Blast Match, waterproof matches, Vaseline balls)
5. Chapstick; (for lips, fire starter, lube for stuck zippers)
6. Acedimniphen, or pain pills of choice.
7. Lightweight space blanket; will fit in a shirt pocket.
8. Vehicle keys
 
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kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
8,468
8,748
55
idaho
I carry two kits in Kifaru Ultralight Pullouts, one that fits inside the other. The smaller is my "day kit" and contains:

120dB whistle
3x lithium AAA batteries for my headlamp (it takes 2, but people I hunt with use headlamps that take 3)
2x Steristrip wound closures
2x Sterile Two's (gauze pads)
Foil mylar rescue blanket
3x alcohol prep wipes
3x BZK antiseptic wipes
10 bandaids
2x nitrile gloves
Micro Starflash signal mirror (with sight)
Sharpie with electrical tape on it
Small baggie of mixed OTC meds: aspirin, benadryl, ibuprofen, antacid, simethicone, caffeine
1x prescription anti-nasea, clearly marked for me
4x zip ties
1 cut-down roll of foam heel tape (enough for about 4 tapings - I blister easily)

All of these items are meant to be so light there's zero excuse not to bring them. (The whole kit is 5.5oz, not that I care - I'm an ounce-fiend but there are some things you just don't negotiate.) Note that I do NOT carry all the "recommended" stuff on prepper lists like "three ways to make fire", compass, or extra knives. When I hunt I'm never without at LEAST two blades, typically at least a belt knife and Gerber Dime EDC in my pocket, plus often my field dressing kit. And as for a compass, my day kit is for times I always know where I am, even without a GPS. They're areas I know, that I've almost always been to before, and I don't get lost easily. Besides, as much as we'd love to believe we can "get into the wilderness", in Colorado you need some planning to get somewhere more than a couple miles from a road or private land, and I wouldn't consider those day trips.

In a larger pullout I can stuff the above into, I carry a few extra items when I know I'm going "farther back", "overnight", or "with people I may need to support" including:

CAT tourniquet
2x chemlight sticks (beats spare batteries any day)
Extra foil mylar blanket
Disposable rain poncho
Leg splint/wrap
Compass
Small amount of waxed tinder, a lighter, and a book of matches
Quick Clot
Water purification tablets (just a few, not the whole bottle)
2x Vicodin I never used from a past operation because I don't take that s*** longer than I have to, but if I break my ankle...
More OTC meds in general from the list above
Two more pairs of nitrile gloves
50' of waxed #36 bank line (half the weight of paracord, 320lbs instead of 550 but that's usually still plenty)
2x safety pins
One more set of AAA batteries
Four more "Sterile 2's", and a handful of extra band-aids, steri-strips, BZK wipes, etc.

In my truck I have a full first aid kit with more of the above, an extra tourniquet, a pulse oximeter, a small can of O2, and for whatever reason I got it in my head to add a Hyvent chest seal for that day I hope never happens and there's an accident in camp and I'm dealing with a sucking chest wound.

My wife thinks I'm crazy, and she knows me better than most...

well , nothing wrong with being a good boy scout.

better to have it and not need it then need it and not have it!
 

tim

Veteran member
Jun 4, 2011
2,253
828
north idaho
I have discovered gauze, tape and moleskin will cover 90% of what you can do in the mountains.

With that said, where, when and for how long dictate what I bring.
 

mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
3,286
2,302
Compass
Electrical tape
2 lighters and Vaseline cotton balls
Water filter (sawyer)
emergency blanket
small first air kit
Small vial of Wonder dust (horse blood clotting powder)
15' of rope
Benadryll
IBU prophin
Chemical heat packs (2)

Just to name a few things.