Hunt alone ? (partner preferred)

P Y Buck

New Member
Jun 20, 2019
8
0
Hey Guys,
I myself without a elk hunting partner for this fall, I had hunted together with a buddy for the past 5-6 years. The hunts were DIY archery elk hunts with OTC tags in Idaho and Colorado. My partner just got to the point where after merely a day or two of hunting he would give up and expect the elk to walk into the tent and say "shoot me"! All the time spent preparing, drive time, expense of the hunt, etc. and to have a partner that would rather go back into town than hunt, well lets just say it was rather deflating.

I am a serious hunter and prefer backpack hunts, but have used base camps as well, but I find myself faced with potentially going alone this fall and to be honest it is not my preference. The fact of being 5-6 miles in at 10,000 feet and sustain an injury of some sort is somewhat concerning to me and my wife. Also, the fact of packing out an animal alone sounds brutal.

Anyone looking to possibly partner up for a archery elk hunt this fall.
I reside in Michigan
 

mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
1,627
13
Dont ask why but when I read this post this thought came to mind. lol


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Good luck in your search for a partner.
 
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kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
3,348
56
idaho
I like to hunt alone . just easier t adjust your game plan that way.

that said , I am not opposed to bringing along a friend to use as a pack mule either.
I also enjoy the role of pack mule when I can't draw my own tag.
 

Maxhunter

Very Active Member
Apr 10, 2011
679
2
Wyoming
I hunt alone 90% of the time. I also prefer it because i can do what I want. I've packed out a lot of elk
by myself. The key is be in decent shape and know your limits. Chosing a good hunting partner can a really tough decision. I don't want someone that isn't self reliant or a crutch to hunt with.
 
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Ikeepitcold

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 22, 2011
8,811
7
Reno Nv
I’ve done a lot of hunting by myself. I don’t think I would want to elk hunt on my own if I had a choice. I would elk hunt solo if it was that or not hunt though. Like said above, know your limits and be in great shape.

Good luck on your search
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,393
69
Gypsum, Co
Old Hatchet Jack's 50 caliber Hawkin, '

It kilt the bear that kilt me. I hope that it ain't no redskin that finds it.

Or something along those lines.
 
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Sawfish

Very Active Member
Jun 9, 2011
693
0
Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
Suggest you check around for an outfitter that sets up drop camps or for a packer. Either of these will provide you with a way to get your elk out, and some will check on you periodically while you are camped. If you do not have a SPOT, get one. I have done a lot of DIY hunts, and the SPOT solves a lot of problems: rescue, emergency, and a way to let your family know you are okay. Good Luck.
 

P Y Buck

New Member
Jun 20, 2019
8
0
Thanks for the information. I have given thought to the Garmin In Reach. Did you do much research on the Spot versus the Garmin In Reach? Any information you can provide about using these units would be appreciated.
 

RICMIC

Veteran member
Feb 21, 2012
1,023
2
Two Harbors, Minnesota
Thanks for the information. I have given thought to the Garmin In Reach. Did you do much research on the Spot versus the Garmin In Reach? Any information you can provide about using these units would be appreciated.
I used a SPOT for years, but this year bought an Inreach Mini. The advantages are that I can send short e-mails to my wife or others, and it uses the Iridian satelite system rather than the Globalstar system that the SPOT uses. Iridian covers the world, 24/7. You can link the Inreach with your smart phone (if you're smart enough) to make texting easier. The SPOT is less expensive to purchase, and basic plans start at $205 per year. The Inreach Mini is about $400, and the other models go up from there. A basic plan is $11.95 per month. If you do have to use the 911/SOS you can actually communicate with the rescuers using the Inreach.
 

kidoggy

Veteran member
Apr 23, 2016
3,348
56
idaho
I don't do the gps stuff, and won't carry a phone on hikes .

reason why folks can't find their way around in the woods is because they can't operate without electronics.

getting away from that B.S is a big part of why I hunt.

if something goes wrong I will deal with it when it happens.
life goes on, till it don't!
 

Aught6Fan

Member
Feb 25, 2013
81
0
Eastern WA
Suggest you check around for an outfitter that sets up drop camps or for a packer. Either of these will provide you with a way to get your elk out, and some will check on you periodically while you are camped. If you do not have a SPOT, get one. I have done a lot of DIY hunts, and the SPOT solves a lot of problems: rescue, emergency, and a way to let your family know you are okay. Good Luck.
Good advice. Haven't used a SPOT or the In Reach, but a way to communicate in an emergency is a good idea. Also makes the wife feel better if you can send an "I'm OK" message from time to time.
 

Mule3006Elk

Active Member
Jul 3, 2013
171
0
InReach, have one, use it every hunt. Doesn't mean one is relying on electronics as others have eluded. I mark my truck and never touch it thereafter. It's for emergencies, injury or lost, fortunately never needed to use it. As someone else commented, definitely makes the wife feels better, which is a huge plus.

I hunt with family but I really enjoy going solo. There's something about being solo that unlocks my natural instinct. I am very in tune with my surroundings (wind, smells, sounds, etc.) when going solo. I hunt earlier, hunt harder, hunt later. I am more successful solo.

If going solo, when compared to having a partner, I don't go as deep in the woods. Figure 2 miles in, for an Elk, minimum of 4 trips, your looking at 14 mountain miles. Four miles, you're looking at 28 mountain miles. Something to think about. Bottom line, going solo, better be in darn good condition. I train 5 days a week and keep my weight in check.
 

BKhunter50

Member
Jan 14, 2017
63
1
Canton, Mississippi
Hunting with the right partner is great. Finding the right partner can be difficult. Hunting alone is a blast under the right circumstances.

I’ve now got three partners that are all great. One is my 27 year old son who I’ve taken hunting since he was 3. The other is a friend I met in church 15 years off. The third is a young engineer I hired 2 years ago. Former Eagle Scout. We’re all going together this year. Can’t wait. I’m the point keeper, draw advisor for the group and when all else fails- the OTC elk coordinator - spot finder. Love it!

I also went by myself elk hunting 2 years ago because my partners were all unavailable. Had a complete blast! Shot a rag horn with my bow in an OTC unit. Would do it again in a heartbeat!

I use SOME electronics (GPS) but I appreciate what Kid said about not using electronics. My buddy from church that goes looks at his GPS WAY TOO MUCH. I usually use mountain features to keep track of where I’m at. One day my GPS buddy was trying to tell me how to get back to camp with his nose buried in his GPS. He was wrong. I stopped and told him where we needed to go based on landmarks and he was just beside himself because I was right. You learn that stuff from experience and NOT growing up with electronics. If you can keep it to a minimum, not using electronic adds to the hunt for me. But, getting lost takes all off the gain away and then some.
 

tim

Veteran member
Jun 4, 2011
1,626
13
north idaho
personally I prefer to hunt alone. it just feels right. However I grew up in the mountains and got lost when I was 13, because I had to hunt solo. Over the years I have learned to wander and figure out where I am. If you do go solo, it will be scary and boring, but the rewards are pretty good.
 

JM77

Member
Apr 25, 2016
88
1
Casper, Wyoming
Carrying a GPS gets me into public ground and keeps me legal. To hunt where I hunt without one is foolish unless you like trespass tickets. It also gets you back to camp when the fog rolls in or a snow squall picks up at dusk and you can't see 50 feet in front of you. Walking back to camp in the dark is common on Sept elk hunts and landmarks don't help when you can't see them.

If you want to be macho, stick it in your pack until you really need it.