Hammocks?

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
6,531
1,251
www.eastmans.com
How many of you have used a Hammock in the backcountry? My wife will use hers on my scouting trips, she will stay at camp and read when I am out glassing. If you have some pictures, they would be great!
 
Last edited:

RockChucker30

Active Member
Feb 22, 2014
162
0
Tennessee
I do. Hammocks have their strengths and weaknesses. Major points are that you have to have some knowledge and gear to keep warm, plus side is they are extremely comfortable.







Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Ikeepitcold

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 22, 2011
9,410
592
Reno Nv
I've got my eye on one with a Kelty tarp. My draw back will be trees. We have mostly junipers where I hunt.
 

Bitterroot Bulls

Veteran member
Apr 25, 2011
2,326
0
Montana
I used a hammock a lot last year. I plan to use it more this year. I want to drop some weight with a cuben tarp and EE quilts (under and over).
 

Drelk

Active Member
Jul 25, 2011
170
0
I have a couple Hennessy hammocks. Very comfortable. Only draw back is I get cold without having a pad underneath me. I think quilts below and on top would be a good solution. Super comfortable
 

aclawrence

New Member
Mar 22, 2015
11
0
Any temp below 70deg in a hammock requires an under quilt. I've got a couple diy's and a warbonnet ridge runner that I love. I also have a few hammock gear quilts which are awesome to. Hammocks definitely have more of a learning curve but are so much more comfortable. As long as I can find two trees you won't catch me sleeping in the ground.
 

RICMIC

Veteran member
Feb 21, 2012
1,532
861
Two Harbors, Minnesota
I sleep in a Hennessey hammock all summer while guiding canoe trips. No shortage of trees in NE Minnesota or Canada. I do bring a XTherm pad and sleeping bag that I use like a blanket. There is a learning curve, and some don't seem to adapt to them, but it is an absolute trip saver for an older guy with a bad back. I don't use it on hunting trips though because there is zero gear room. My Kuiu 2P tent weighs the same, has room for two, and we can get all our gear in the vestibules.
 

ivorytip

Veteran member
Mar 24, 2012
3,759
29
Any temp below 70deg in a hammock requires an under quilt. I've got a couple diy's and a warbonnet ridge runner that I love. I also have a few hammock gear quilts which are awesome to. Hammocks definitely have more of a learning curve but are so much more comfortable. As long as I can find two trees you won't catch me sleeping in the ground.
any temp below 70?
 

aclawrence

New Member
Mar 22, 2015
11
0
Yes it's a pretty standard rule of thumb for hammocks. You'll start to get cold without a pad or quilt underneath you. Of course everyone's a little different.

If anyone is interested in learning more about hammocks the hammock forum is a great place to learn and also Shug's videos on YouTube are awesome. You can get by with a pad and sleeping bag buts quilts are where it's at for a hammock system. All you need is a hammock, top quilt, under quilt, and a tarp.
 

bowrunner

Active Member
Oct 13, 2015
299
9
Illinois
I just got a emo double hammock from REI outlet. There was an additional 25% off but the sale ended yesterday. After the discount it was $47 plus a couple dollars tax and free shipping. So all in for about $50... It is still up on the website for $62, but you wont get the 25% off anymore.
 
Last edited:

ivorytip

Veteran member
Mar 24, 2012
3,759
29
Yes it's a pretty standard rule of thumb for hammocks. You'll start to get cold without a pad or quilt underneath you. Of course everyone's a little different.

If anyone is interested in learning more about hammocks the hammock forum is a great place to learn and also Shug's videos on YouTube are awesome. You can get by with a pad and sleeping bag buts quilts are where it's at for a hammock system. All you need is a hammock, top quilt, under quilt, and a tarp.
maybe im just a real hot sleeper but if its 70 out during the night, and I have never seen a night in the 70s here, id be sleeping naked to stay cool. ill have to check that out
 

aclawrence

New Member
Mar 22, 2015
11
0
It's kind of like hanging meat in a freezer. I can't explain the science very well but if your a hot sleeper a hammock is a great option when it's warm outside.
 

ColoradoV

Very Active Member
Oct 4, 2011
693
451
I got a couple of the eno double hammock's and have slept in them overnight early season in colorado. Most times I throw it on or in the pack to take a nap in during the day. As others have said if you are sleeping overnight a pad is needed to keep off the cold.

They are light and there is no better way to nap as you only need 2 trees. I tie mine up w paracord.

Long extended trips where weather in uncertain I will still carry a tent.
 

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
6,531
1,251
www.eastmans.com
There may or may not be a hammock up for grabs in a giveaway this week...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ivorytip

Veteran member
Mar 24, 2012
3,759
29
It's kind of like hanging meat in a freezer. I can't explain the science very well but if your a hot sleeper a hammock is a great option when it's warm outside.
got ya, I wasn't understanding the quilt thing, Google image clarified for me:) Id like to explore more with the hammock, hunting option.
 

aclawrence

New Member
Mar 22, 2015
11
0
Dutchware is a great place to pick up any kind of hammock accessories you can think of. He also sells some of his own hammocks. I would definitely recommend a set of tree straps over paracord. The straps won't stretch and are not as bad on the trees. A hammock wouldn't be bad to keep in your day pack either in case you have to spend the night away from you camp. You might get cold but at least you wouldn't be on the ground.
 

Usmcvet

New Member
Jul 6, 2016
9
0
Using a hammock definitely has a learning curve so I highly suggest perfecting your technique in your backyard before the backcountry. It's usually always uncomfortable the first few times until you figure it out, but once you find your sweet spot it's golden. I run an ENO Doublenest, with the ProTarp, and underbelly. I use a ThermaRest inflatable inside it. It does a few things: 1) Provides insulation while you're suspended and there's airflow beneath you and your sleeping bag is compressed; 2) holds my hammock open even if I'm not lying diagonally in it; 3) always leaves me the option to go to the ground if I can't find any suitable trees. To keep my shoulders from getting cold I made foam wing pads from an old military iso mat cut in half & then half again. I fit those wing pads with a piece of non-slip rug runners that keeps me & my bag from sliding around. The underbelly hangs under my hammock where my pack goes hanging off the ground.