best brand of "musket cap"

tmitch

Member
Feb 12, 2013
75
0
Idaho
in the past I have always used CCI musket caps, since 209s are not legal in ID. I'm about out of caps, and am looking for info on the best cap (reliable, hot ignition). I have come across the discussion that the "new" CCI musket caps are for "reenactment only", and only throw a flame similar to a standard #11 cap. It even says "for reenactment only" on the tin. The new caps have 4 wings, and the old ones had 6, for identity purposes. This doesn't sound good to me. What do you folks think? What's the best musket cap out there?
 

Musket Man

Veteran member
Jul 20, 2011
6,457
0
colfax, wa
I have been using the reenactment only musket caps simply because they were the only thing I could find when I converted my ML for Washington. They work ok and the only shot I have taken with them at a deer filled my tag. I did notice the barrel fowls more then with 209's and it did not shoot very well if I didnt clean between every shot.
 

tmitch

Member
Feb 12, 2013
75
0
Idaho
i got my hands on some RWS caps. I think they are German made (sorry everyone, but I wanted to try them), I am going to shoot tomorrow. I will report on the outcome. My "no excuses" bullets arrived today, I have HI hopes.
 

Umpqua Hunter

Veteran member
May 26, 2011
3,563
45
56
North Umpqua, Oregon
I switched to musket caps for two years then went back to #11 magnum caps. One problem with musket caps are the slits in the side that can let moisture in. I have also had issues that musket caps are a bit touchy to being struck "just so" to go off reliably. I understand that #11 magnum caps throw a very similar flame to musket caps.

I am now shooting a competition grade Treso nipple for the #11 caps which has a very tight fit, I recall a cut names "sabot loader" got me on to these (may be a different forum). I had to drill it out a few thousandths of an inch to have the same flame channel as my normal hunting nipples. It takes a bit of pressure to seat my caps well on these nipples, so it stretches the cap slightly, but that gives me confidence in the weatherproofing. I am feeling really good that I now have a great flame, good weather proofing and a properly sized flame channel for hunting.
 

tmitch

Member
Feb 12, 2013
75
0
Idaho
That makes sense what you are saying about the moisture and the musket caps. I haven't had a negative outcome "yet", but I'd rather not ever have one. I will have to check if my Traditions Vortex can take a #11 nipple. I assume the firing mechanism would work for a #11 but not for sure.

So you said you had a cap fall off in Colorado and it cost you a crack at a bull. Were you using a different gun, with maybe a 209 ignition (I'm not sure what is legal in CO, still building points there, so I haven't muzzleloader hunted there yet).
 

Umpqua Hunter

Veteran member
May 26, 2011
3,563
45
56
North Umpqua, Oregon
So you said you had a cap fall off in Colorado and it cost you a crack at a bull. Were you using a different gun, with maybe a 209 ignition (I'm not sure what is legal in CO, still building points there, so I haven't muzzleloader hunted there yet).
It was a 209 ignition.

Last year I spent a lot of time working on cap and nipple fit. Not all #11 cap brands are sized the same. Also nipples, especially between brands, vary quite a bit. To weather proof and have reliable ignition, look for a snug fit and a way to reliably seat the cap. I actually have a shaped a small block of delrin (plastic) I put behind the cap and press it into place. Some guys use cappers that are rigid enough to firmly seat the cap. You need the cap to go on true (not cockeyed) as well to prevent misfires.

I also have a small drill the size of the flame channel and I chase the hole out every time I clean it. I often use a welding torch tip cleaner as well.

To summarize:

1. Determined a magnum cap you wanted to use (go with CCI or RWS)
2. Find a nipple that is a snug fit and try several caps on it.
3. Determine a method to seat the cap straight and firmly. If you "stretch" the side of the cap ever so slightly that will help weather proof.
4. Be vigilant about keeping the flame channel clean. One post I read once said "the root of all evil in muzzleloader is a dirty breach".

Follow this and you should have a gun that goes boom reliably.
 
Last edited: