Best boots for elk hunting

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
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Gypsum, Co
The ones that you can wear for 12 hours hiking up and down some steep rocky country.

There is no set answer besides the above. If you are hunting in snow you want different boots than if you are hunting a dry hot fall.

Do your feet get cold easily? If so you might want more insulation than normal. I don't want anymore than 400grams of insulation, others like 800 or more. If you are hunting in wet snow you'll need water resistant boots, don't fall for those that say that they are waterproof unless they are a rubber boot.

I like Mendli boots, Cabela's carried them as their store brand until they sold out, now there is a shop in Nebraska that carries them.
 

taskswap

Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
487
348
Colorado
The ones that fit you PERFECTLY.

I've been through as many pairs of boots as I have backpacks (a lot). They all had tons of great-seeming labels with brand of insulation layers, waterproofing, and other features. Some were as little as $50 and others as much as $400. But at the end of the day I keep going back to a pair of moderately priced Timberlands. I think they were $90. It's not because I think they're perfect for everyone, or "designed for elk hunting" (whatever that means - mostly "elk hunting" is "walking over rocky sh*t" IMHO). They just fit my weird wide-width high-arched feet really well. When you're in a pair of boots for 8-14 hours that's what you want: a perfect fit.

I'll tell you one thing though. Price does NOT move me on boots. I didn't even look at the price tag on these. I had honestly forgotten - I had to Google it. I fractured my heel in last year's season and it STILL hurts. I would rather spend $1000 on boots and $100 on rifle than the other way around. At least for midwest elk...
 
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Maxhunter

Veteran member
Apr 10, 2011
1,042
381
Wyoming
I agree with all the comments above. You should go and try on different brands and see which one fits your feet best. I like Kennetrek Mountian Extremes. I have both insulated and unisulated. You want boots with good ankle support.
 
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RICMIC

Veteran member
Feb 21, 2012
1,600
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Two Harbors, Minnesota
Fit is King, and you need to try the different brands and styles to find what suites you. I wear different half sizes depending on the mfg., and will switch boots depending on the season, terrain, and weather. Whenever I have the option I will bring 2 or 3 pairs on a trip, and change as the situation dictates.
 
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Jmw280

New Member
Oct 24, 2020
4
16
Take a look at the Meindl Comfort Fit Hunter. I put 53 treadmill miles on these boots conditioning for my Colorado Public Land Elk Hunt this year. On the hunt, I put well over 30 on them in some of the roughest terrain that you’ll see.
Paired with good merino wool socks, not one hotspot or blister, they were perfect for me.
Great support and comfortable.
Best of Luck.
 
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kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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idaho
which boots is made fer walkin? cause walkins wut ah do.
one o these days muh boots is gunna walk all ova u. o_O
 

go_deep

Veteran member
Nov 30, 2014
2,477
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Wyoming
Here's the best answer for the what gear should i buy questions. You have to pick the one that fits you best, only you will know. Boots, socks, LJ,s, pants, shirts, different insulation levels, different kinds of insulation types, packs, heck even binos, scopes, and rifles can and are different for different people. So, go try some on is the best advise.
 

buckbull

Veteran member
Jun 20, 2011
1,617
604
All solid info above. Just wanted to point out you can go with a custom insole/boots like those provided by Lathrop and Sons. Even pricier than pricy.
 

ColoradoV

Very Active Member
Oct 4, 2011
711
521
I use lowa Tibet’s if I need a mountain boot or have a big pack on.

Most days or almost all days the past few years I have been in trail running shoes or the Salomon speed cross gtx. Might try the Kona trail runner this year.
 

tombanton852

New Member
Jul 15, 2021
1
0
I am using Danner Manufacturing Hunting Shoes and the long shaft is compulsory for hunting purposes because it helps in a better fitting, covering the legs, and preventing external objects like insects and water. The leather hunting boots are made of imported and 100% pure leather for increased durability and added strength. The leather resists water, liquids, and other harmful chemicals that may affect the feet badly.
 

DanPickar

Active Member
Mar 4, 2014
282
93
Wyoming
Depends if you have good or bad feet. I like Zamerlans, Salomons, kenetreks, Crispi. I don't require a lot of foot support for most deer and elk hunting so I like light hikers. For rough country or Sheep hunting I like a stiff sole with ankle support.
 

buckbull

Veteran member
Jun 20, 2011
1,617
604
I am using Danner Manufacturing Hunting Shoes and the long shaft is compulsory for hunting purposes because it helps in a better fitting, covering the legs, and preventing external objects like insects and water. The leather hunting boots are made of imported and 100% pure leather for increased durability and added strength. The leather resists water, liquids, and other harmful chemicals that may affect the feet badly.
If you are going to turn spamming into a successful career, I highly recommend you learn how to write coherent English.
 
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I like my Crispi's for early season. With that said.... they may not be for you. Get what fits YOU the best, this may take some trial and error. I had another brand of expensive boots that even the wides were just too thin for my fat feet... even in the wide version.
Another tip would be.... no matter what you get, toss the run-of-the-mill insole that comes with it and get an insole tailored to the arches in your feet. It will make the boots that much better. I like the Currex HikePro Insoles the best.