Antelope Rangefinder

go_deep

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Nov 30, 2014
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Wyoming
I'm looking to buy a rangefinder that will actually give a range out to 500 yards on an Antelope. Looking for first hand experiences, I'm not looking to buy the most expensive, but want something that will last.
 
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El Serio

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Feb 1, 2018
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I bought mine several years ago, so the model isn't current, but at the time I had to get a Leica to reliably range them at that distance. We tried various Nikon, Leupold and Vortex, but none of them would do 500 yds on antelope consistently. First I got an older 1200 model that was held horizontally (LRF 1200), then I upgraded to the 1600-B. You might be able to find a used older one that would work without giving an arm and a leg.
 
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kidoggy

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Apr 23, 2016
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I bought a vortex 1200 a couple years ago that does pretty well out to 500.
was told when I bought it that if it said it was good for 1200 expect half that to be the rule on most rangefinders.

as with most optics ,you get what you pay for.
 
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dan maule

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Jan 3, 2015
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Upper Michigan
I have the Leupold Marksman 1000. I was very disappointed on our antelope hunt this September. I thought it did well here in Michigan but in the bright sun in Wyoming couldn’t get much more than 300. In the morning and evening I could get quite a bit more.
 

go_deep

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Nov 30, 2014
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Thinking I need to buy something that's at least labeled 1600 yards to get a 500 yard reading on an Antelope.
 
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JimP

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Mar 28, 2016
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On range finders you have to be real careful on what you are buying. To get the most yardage out of any of them you are going to have to range a item that is reflective and not something that is going to absorb light such as a animal hide. I am sure that those that go out to 1200 yards is reflective range.

They also say that they may not work in bright light, since you are shooting a lazier out to the animal or object the lazier light will get absorbed into the surrounding bright light.

Technology isn't all it is cut out to be.

I have come up against this a number of times when just checking ranges. Then instead of shooting the range to the animal I'll see if there is a rock or something near them to shoot the range to

I added to the post in a edit
 

El Serio

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Feb 1, 2018
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Thinking I need to buy something that's at least labeled 1600 yards to get a 500 yard reading on an Antelope.
That's probably a good plan. My old Leica 1200 would do it pretty consistently, but a Nikon 1200 really struggled (once in a while it would range 500 if lighting was just right) Once I bought the Leica 1600, I stopped looking at rangefinders, because it does everything I need and the better optics made it useful in low light situations where I couldn't see my target with the cheaper models.
 
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DRUSS

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Jun 22, 2014
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nw oregon
had good luck with my 1600 leica and my new leica 3500. a friend just got the new rangefinder from gunwerks and it seems like it will be a good choice also
 

RICMIC

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Feb 21, 2012
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Two Harbors, Minnesota
Advances in optics have left me behind, and I was just about to make a major purchase on a major brand name stabilized bino before finding out that it was made in China. There are quality choices out there without spending big bucks to cut our own throats. My Leupold 1000TBR still works for me, so there is no need to upgrade there.
 
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