9 Day Backcountry Hunt

Montana

Veteran member
Nov 3, 2011
1,085
356
Bitterroot Valley, MT.
Howdy all... I just read Matt post and I'm going to piggyback off it since it's 8 months old... I'd love to hear some different ideas. Here's what packed for food. Bars consist of - Cliff, Kind, Kashi, Snickers, Sweet n Salty. Tuna is a variety of flavors.

Day 1 - Breakfast Burrito, bar, Salami Sandwich, bar, Burrito.
Day 2 - Exact same (perishables)
Day 3 - Oatmeal (sliced almonds dried berries), bar, Pnut btr & honey sandwich, bar, dried soup/tuna.
Day 4 - Mt. House, bar, Ramen/tuna, bar, Mt. House
Day 5 - Granola (dried berries & pwdr milk), bar, Mac n chz/tuna, bar, dried soup/tuna
Day 6 - Repeat day 3
Day 7 - Repeat day 4
Day 8 - Repeat day 5
Day 9 - Oatmeal w/ sliced almonds and dried berries, bar, fat greasy cheeseburger with fries and 5 pops :)

Thanks in advance guys.

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
 

Bonecollector

Veteran member
Mar 9, 2014
5,371
2,495
Ohio
Looks good to me! On a side note, I try not to eat anything hot/spicy so as to avoid over-consuming water if it's tough to come by. But not to the point of dehydrating myself. lol
 

Never in Doubt

Active Member
Jul 9, 2012
304
0
Looks good to me. I like to mix in something tasty and light for an additional snack. Like cheezits or frito corn chips. Makes the trip even more enjoyable haha. Sometimes I'll pack in string cheese
 
Jun 29, 2016
92
37
Coastal Maine
Gotta take tortillas easier to carry than bread and they go with everything. good move. Sardines are some good after a couple days of trail food. Ive seen people pour hot not boiling water into the instant oatmeal packs stir and enjoy. LNT hippies but it worked great. and no dish to wash. No coffee or is that a given? some pre packaged Thai food has rice noodles that cook really fast. Naturally the canoe guide lugs too much stuff. You can stuff all kinds of stuff in a 17' canoe.
 

Montana

Veteran member
Nov 3, 2011
1,085
356
Bitterroot Valley, MT.
Gotta take tortillas easier to carry than bread and they go with everything. good move. Sardines are some good after a couple days of trail food. Ive seen people pour hot not boiling water into the instant oatmeal packs stir and enjoy. LNT hippies but it worked great. and no dish to wash. No coffee or is that a given? some pre packaged Thai food has rice noodles that cook really fast. Naturally the canoe guide lugs too much stuff. You can stuff all kinds of stuff in a 17' canoe.
Funny on the coffee comment... yes, it's a given. Great tip on the torts, I was trying to figure out how to not squash my bread.
Thanks.

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
 
Jun 29, 2016
92
37
Coastal Maine
A thing to consider. If you are new to tortillas there are two kinds. flour and corn. Flour is not as good for you and they are rarely eaten in Mexico except Baja. Corn is the heartbeat of Mexico BUT you HAVE to heat them. If you brought corn
and pb&j you would never hear the end of it. My advice bring both kinds. We eat a lot of Quesadillas camping. 9 days wow... Slay-Em.
 

Collins

New Member
Feb 8, 2016
32
0
Green Bay, WI
I just got back from an 8 day trip, here was my food list....one mountain house meal each night.....6 full white bagels, 6 packs of Justin's almond butter for the bagels. 1 tuna packet for each full day. 1 cliff bar for each full day. Then I had 4 big power bars I used for mid morning breakfast, every other day. Gatorade powder packets to add to my water. May not sound like much but it was perfect, I don't get crazy hungry while hunting in the mountains anyway. Drink more water than anything. Oh, not to mention a couple cans of Grizzly to serve as meal replacement. Seriously though, the bagels worked great, this was the first year I tried that.
 

nomadicbohunk

New Member
Sep 24, 2016
3
0
First, I want to say I grew up eating good food and everything was home butchered ect. Now, my mom wasn't the best cook, so I learned to cook early. And I enjoy it. I cook a lot and will try anything once. I'm also good at it. Anyway...

I spent a long time doing seasonal and term jobs as a biologist before grad school. So did my girlfriend. Think remote Alaska getting dropped off with a helicopter for 3 weeks of spike camping from where you're setting up, 14 days on the AZ strip at a time on foot, a couple days in town and back out, etc. Americorps, peace corps. We've eaten some crap for long periods. You get the idea. Anyway, I've done more than my fair share of backpacking and so has she. Now we're not doing that kind of field work, but we've camped over 70 nights this year already and didn't camp a single day in July. About half of that is backpacking.

We're not huge fans of gorp and stuff like that. It's not as filling to us and is just too sweet. If I never eat a bar again it will be too soon. Luna and Lara bars were my favorite. Man cannot live on that type of stuff alone.

Some favorites: I like cans of sardines and such, but they are heavy. I drink the oil. There is a Portuguese brand that is expensive that is light years above anything else. I just know the logo. Sorry.

Crackers. So many crackers. And pasta. Those are my main starches after 3 days of bread.

Go get some real cured meat. Columbus is a good brand. So is la Quercia. Cured meat you don't have to keep cold. The same goes for real hard cheese. Real cheese. Go to whole paycheck or something for it. Salami, pepperoni, etc. Dry hot Spanish chorizo is my favorite, but it's very hard to find. A friend of mine spent 100 days canoeing the arctic and took along an entire $500 prosciutto ham whole as his only protein.

Commercial dried meals are crap compared to what you can make. Spaghetti leather, hamburger gravel, etc. I do like dried rehydrated lettuce. Cous cous is amazing backpacking. Toss some with water a few hours before you eat and add in some olive oil and whatever seasoning.

Rice noodles from an asian market are like manna from heaven. Mix soy sauce and oyster sauce (definitely get megachef brand). You won't have to keep that cold. Soak the rice noodles in water, then stir fry in oil...add the sauce and let it cook in.

Also, for weird stuff like olive oil, Nalgene makes all kinds of different containers for science reasons. They're awesome for things like that.

I hope that helps or gives you some ideas.