6.5 Creedmoor

youngbuck2

Member
Nov 4, 2016
69
1
Minnesota
Hey all, i apologize if there is a similar post buried in the forum and this is redundant.

I wasnt really looking but am always open to deals and I came across a new ruger 6.5 creedmoor for a price that was borderline robbery. What is everyone's experience and or thoughts on the caliber for elk hunting. I understand that ammo tops out at 143 gr. which is probably a bit light for the big critter but people seem to using them more and more.
 

taskswap

Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
210
71
Colorado
I have a buddy who just "upgraded" his heavy 30-06 rifle to a new 6.5 lightweight one. He's over the moon. He's been texting me every day about how light his rifle is and how tight his groups are at 300yds. I might have to unfriend him. :cool:
 

youngbuck2

Member
Nov 4, 2016
69
1
Minnesota
I have a buddy who just "upgraded" his heavy 30-06 rifle to a new 6.5 lightweight one. He's over the moon. He's been texting me every day about how light his rifle is and how tight his groups are at 300yds. I might have to unfriend him. :cool:
It seems the people that have them, absolutely love them! I may bring it along this year to the high country and see what happens.
 

rjroberts15

Member
Jun 8, 2016
110
0
CA
I bought a Ruger American predator for my son. It shoots 0.5" groups @100.
I don't like the stock on it. It feels cheap and like it flexes when shooting from different positions.
I am going to replace the stock one with a bell and Carlson.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

JimP

Veteran member
Mar 28, 2016
3,682
426
Gypsum, Co
The 6.5 Creedmore was designed for a long range target rifle and not a long range hunting rifle.

It is just my opinion but I believe that it will work just fine on antelope and deer out to extended ranges but when you step up to a elk you need to find a rifle that shoots a heaver bullet.

Yes, it will kill a elk if you shoot it in the correct place, but then so will a .22Lr.
 

youngbuck2

Member
Nov 4, 2016
69
1
Minnesota
Thanks for the feedback. Its all matching the research I've done. Ballistic wise, its not much different than my .270, was just wondering what the hype was all about. Either way, a nice addition to the safe!
 

Wyoming Hart

Very Active Member
Oct 10, 2014
770
23
Spring Run, PA
Like others have said, it has and will kill elk. If I were you, I would get the gun either way. I got one and love to shoot it. Everything about that package (gun, ammo., caliber) are very easy on the wallet. Ruger is a great American company to boot.
 

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
5,727
333
www.eastmans.com
Scrub through to the kill shot at the end. You can hear Ike tell me the distance, 480 yards and it did the trick. Personally I wouldn't use this cartridge for anything bigger than mule deer, but I am sold on this rifle for deer and antelope.
[video=youtube_share;J92139sErcs]https://youtu.be/J92139sErcs[/video]
 
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Colorado Cowboy

Veteran member
Jun 8, 2011
6,029
266
78
Dolores, Colorado
I know some of you will take issue with what I am going to say. I don't care for anything less than .30 cal/180 gr bullet for use on elk and anything larger. I want something that will break bones and penetrate the animal, hence my choice.

Just sayin......................

Left out the bullet I use....Nolser Partition. Old school, but has never let me down on elk or moose.
 
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Tim McCoy

Veteran member
Dec 15, 2014
1,855
1
Oregon
Am lucky in that we get to shoot multiple elk most years. Most are cows, which are plenty big when mature, but we bull hunt too. Have successfully used 25-06, 260, 270, 7-08, 280 and 30-06. Some of my quickest kills have been with a 270/130TTSX and 280/175 partitions.

Two thoughts, bullet placement trumps everything, bullet choice is important too. Cartridge choice is much further down the list. Our last two bulls were killed with a 270 and 130gr TTSX?s. Trust me, a 130gr TTSX will break plenty of bones, a 130gr SST/BT not so much. We were hunting an area where the max range is about 300. The TTSX my bull took, messed up two shoulder blades and the spine, and may still be going for all I know.

So to make a long winded point, if using less powerful choices, like the 6.5CM, make darned sure to use a good bullet. At CM velocities, I believe the 143ELD-X will work, but I have no experience with that one, and would wait for a broadside shot if using it. We have used 140gr corelokts out of a 260 to good effect on several cows, all through the slats. I prefer a TTSX/GMX/A-frame or the like with smaller cartridges. If I am going on a hunt where a mature bull is the target, I want more HP than the CM delivers. 270/280 with good bullets are sensible minimums, with 30 calibers or 7mm mags of some sort being better still.

If you can wait for perfect broadside shots and have good placement, regular cup and core bullets are deadly on elk, within limits. Some being bullets not driven to extreme velocities, range to 350-400 yards, maybe a bit more. The CM fills that bill imo.
 
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mallardsx2

Veteran member
Jul 8, 2015
1,819
191
I'm going to stick with my usual go-to statement.

1.JPG

I should add that my wife's 6.5 creedmoor shoots Remington Cor-loks well. Think they are 140 grain pills.

She was hitting pie plates at 400 yards. Not bad for cheap ammo.
 
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youngbuck2

Member
Nov 4, 2016
69
1
Minnesota
Am lucky in that we get to shoot multiple elk most years. Most are cows, which are plenty big when mature, but we bull hunt too. Have successfully used 25-06, 260, 270, 7-08, 280 and 30-06. Some of my quickest kills have been with a 270/130TTSX and 280/175 partitions.

Two thoughts, bullet placement trumps everything, bullet choice is important too. Cartridge choice is much further down the list. Our last two bulls were killed with a 270 and 130gr TTSX?s. Trust me, a 130gr TTSX will break plenty of bones, a 130gr SST/BT not so much. We were hunting an area where the max range is about 300. The TTSX my bull took, messed up two shoulder blades and the spine, and may still be going for all I know.

So to make a long winded point, if using less powerful choices, like the 6.5CM, make darned sure to use a good bullet. At CM velocities, I believe the 143ELD-X will work, but I have no experience with that one, and would wait for a broadside shot if using it. We have used 140gr corelokts out of a 260 to good effect on several cows, all through the slats. I prefer a TTSX/GMX/A-frame or the like with smaller cartridges. If I am going on a hunt where a mature bull is the target, I want more HP than the CM delivers. 270/280 with good bullets are sensible minimums, with 30 calibers or 7mm mags of some sort being better still.

If you can wait for perfect broadside shots and have good placement, regular cup and core bullets are deadly on elk, within limits. Some being bullets not driven to extreme velocities, range to 350-400 yards, maybe a bit more. The CM fills that bill imo.
This is exactly my thoughts. I was fortunate enough to harvest my first elk last year, and got the job done with my .270. I made the mistake of shooting 140 gr. sst's and didnt get pass through on any of the shots which got my wheels turning. I have since changed to 145 gr. ELD-X ammo and hope to get another opportunity. I bought a .300 WSM as my "elk gun" 3 years ago, but taking accuracy and shot placement the highest priority, it stays in the case as a backup.

Anyway it sounds like I have a sweet deer rifle for the kids in the future if nothing else.
 

Tim McCoy

Veteran member
Dec 15, 2014
1,855
1
Oregon
This is exactly my thoughts. I was fortunate enough to harvest my first elk last year, and got the job done with my .270. I made the mistake of shooting 140 gr. sst's and didnt get pass through on any of the shots which got my wheels turning. I have since changed to 145 gr. ELD-X ammo and hope to get another opportunity. I bought a .300 WSM as my "elk gun" 3 years ago, but taking accuracy and shot placement the highest priority, it stays in the case as a backup.

Anyway it sounds like I have a sweet deer rifle for the kids in the future if nothing else.
That 145 eld-x is designed to open up fast at low velocity. At 270 speeds, it’s likely to perform much like the 140SST. If you want pass throughs on elk from that 270, especially if fairly close, try a TTSX, LRX, GMX or other premium offerings at least 140gr if not 150gr. Doubletap Ammo makes a 160 partition that may fill that bill too.

The 6.5CM will make a great kids rifle. Mild recoil and good bullet selections. The 260 was my choice for my youngest son’s first BG rifle, that was in the dark ages pre-CM. If I could get one to shoot 120gr TTSX’s or 127gr LRX’s, you’d have a light bullet with low recoil that would be as lethal or more so than a 140-143gr cup and core bullet. My 260 likes core-lokts, on broadside shoots at cows at 150+ yards, we usually get exits.

If I bought a kids rifle today, it would be the 6.5CM. Tons of ammo selections and just half a heart beat behind the 260, ballistically speaking, but no animal would ever notice a difference.
 

taskswap

Active Member
Jul 9, 2018
210
71
Colorado
While we're talking "not my gun" I'd like to give a shout out to the 7mm-08. I just bought my wife the Weatherby Camilla in that and she's over the MOON about it. The Camilla is a rifle designed specifically for women and for the price it's amazing. Most women get stuck with a "youth gun" and it's still not right for them. (The Camilla has a shorter length of pull but also a raised comb and different angle on the butt stock.)

It's available in 6.5cm too.
 

graybird

Active Member
Feb 22, 2011
338
39
Colorado
While we're talking "not my gun" I'd like to give a shout out to the 7mm-08. I just bought my wife the Weatherby Camilla in that and she's over the MOON about it. The Camilla is a rifle designed specifically for women and for the price it's amazing. Most women get stuck with a "youth gun" and it's still not right for them. (The Camilla has a shorter length of pull but also a raised comb and different angle on the butt stock.)

It's available in 6.5cm too.
I've killed two cows with my 7mm-08 using the 120 gr TTSX. Both shots were within 150 yards, one cow took two shots and stumbled backwards about 5 yards into a treetop, the other took a single shot and slid downhill about 15 yards. Couldn't ask for better on-game performance.
 

tim

Veteran member
Jun 4, 2011
1,703
155
north idaho
this is from a text my bud sent me. He stole this from another forum.

the 6.5 cm
the bullet will clean your weapon, kill a gobbler in flight, knock out a commie satellite and file your taxes for you.

it is that good of a cartridge!