2 man Hot Tent Options - 2019

Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
Whats the scoop on the best 2 man options in a portable hot tent currently on the market for the DIY hunter?

I've been saving up for Cimmarron hot tent combo for a few yrs and am nearly ready to part with my stash (though for some reason I am suddenly wanting a new longer range rifle lol); based on prior conversations and research, that seemed like the best option for me-a Cimmaron with the large stove. Is there anything else I should be looking at near the same price point? Are there newer hot tent designs?
 

Bonecollector

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Mar 9, 2014
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Ohio
I am following this thread as I too have toiled with the 'hot tent' idea. I've heard that there are a few better options for the stove than was SO offers. I've also heard to go up to a large stove over the medium. Minimal weight difference but easy of loading.
Any thoughts on these points?
 
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Prerylyon

Veteran member
Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
I am following this thread as I too have toiled with the 'hot tent' idea. I've heard that there are a few better options for the stove than was SO offers. I've also heard to go up to a large stove over the medium. Minimal weight difference but easy of loading.
Any thoughts on these points?
'BC,

Two other portable woodstove options I'm aware of are one from an outfit in Utah, Titanium goat maybe? And another was based in Canada. The Canadian stove was tubular in design. I think both can be found in google searches. FWIW, in my research, it was inconclusive on the stove, as everyone loved the one they had it seemed lol. I would be curious to hear from members that used or were around any of these portable woodstoves.
 
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Slugz

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Oct 12, 2014
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Yeah......thats the thing.....and I've seen/heard the same.....they are all very nice, pack well, burn well, engineered well. I haven't heard of one that was better or any drastic thoughts/comments. All my buddies love the one " they are with" :)

I'm partial to the Smith Cylinder Stove
 

joens

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Nov 30, 2015
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Miles City, Montana

mcseal2

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Mar 1, 2011
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midwest
I have several tarps from Kifaru and Seekoutside. They are all great, nothing wrong with either company. The big shelter me and my buddy bought together is a Seek 8 man tipi. I don't think you will go wrong with either, just pick the size you want and buy it.

On stoves I personally prefer a flat top stove just for the reason Micah S's pic shows.
 
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Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
I have several tarps from Kifaru and Seekoutside. They are all great, nothing wrong with either company. The big shelter me and my buddy bought together is a Seek 8 man tipi. I don't think you will go wrong with either, just pick the size you want and buy it.

On stoves I personally prefer a flat top stove just for the reason Micah S's pic shows.
Yeah. To me, a larger stove for longer burn, and a stable stove, to have the option of heating water or (frying up fresh deer heart!) would be an acceptable penalty for increased stove weight.
 
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tim

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Jun 4, 2011
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north idaho
these are portable stoves, you will be burning kindling, not logs, you will not get long burns, but burns. if you think you are going to load it up and shut it down for the night, like at your home, you are very mistaken. great product, the heat is awesome, but they do require continues loading of kindling. i have a 4 man tipi with a small stove and a 8 man tipi with a large stove.
tearing down the stove is time consuming, same with setting up. I love mine, but they are nothing like the stove in my house or shop.
 
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mcseal2

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Mar 1, 2011
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Definitely. The larger top to boil water or set a small skillet on is nice, but the burn time is not going to be long. I tried putting some un-split 3" rounds of pine on the coals in my XL stove when I was first using it and they did not burn well. It seems to be much better with split wood or smaller diameter stuff. I just burn small stuff when awake and plan on feeding it often, letting it go out when I go to sleep.
 
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Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
these are portable stoves, you will be burning kindling, not logs, you will not get long burns, but burns. if you think you are going to load it up and shut it down for the night, like at your home, you are very mistaken. great product, the heat is awesome, but they do require continues loading of kindling. i have a 4 man tipi with a small stove and a 8 man tipi with a large stove.
tearing down the stove is time consuming, same with setting up. I love mine, but they are nothing like the stove in my house or shop.
I hear ya; from most stuff I've seen about the stoves, guys seem to get an hour or two out of them at most, depending on their setup; and like you say, feeding it sticks. To have the ability to safely create some heat to warm up or dry stuff is a really big deal. If I hunted more often and had the gear to tote one in to the backcountry, I'd probaby spring for a heavy wall tent and stove. During the times I've hunted and camped in cold conditions out of a heated wall tent, having heat to dry out was friggin amazing.
 

Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
Gonna give this a bump...

The snowtrekker stuff looked pretty cool; just a little heavier than I might like for going in on foot. For guys with access to horses or some other means of packing stuff in deep, they looked real good, filling in a spot of a higher performance, yet lighter than traditional wall tent gear. Good to learn about another option. 👍

Back on the backpack light weight stuff, anyone have experience with the SO LBO shelter system? (LBO= Little BugOut) Its kinda interesting on paper, as its modular, apparently you can add on to a more minimal shelter to make something larger; or, go in reverse to make it work for a solo trek for less people.
 

ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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Feb 3, 2014
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I hear ya; from most stuff I've seen about the stoves, guys seem to get an hour or two out of them at most, depending on their setup; and like you say, feeding it sticks. To have the ability to safely create some heat to warm up or dry stuff is a really big deal. If I hunted more often and had the gear to tote one in to the backcountry, I'd probaby spring for a heavy wall tent and stove. During the times I've hunted and camped in cold conditions out of a heated wall tent, having heat to dry out was friggin amazing.
It does wonders for the mental game!
 
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ScottR

Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
Staff member
Feb 3, 2014
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www.eastmans.com
Gonna give this a bump...

The snowtrekker stuff looked pretty cool; just a little heavier than I might like for going in on foot. For guys with access to horses or some other means of packing stuff in deep, they looked real good, filling in a spot of a higher performance, yet lighter than traditional wall tent gear. Good to learn about another option. 👍

Back on the backpack light weight stuff, anyone have experience with the SO LBO shelter system? (LBO= Little BugOut) Its kinda interesting on paper, as its modular, apparently you can add on to a more minimal shelter to make something larger; or, go in reverse to make it work for a solo trek for less people.
I believe that I was number 3 to test the original model. Still own two bases and a nest. Only disadvantage is not being able to stand up inside.
 
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kevin_T

New Member
Aug 19, 2011
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Kevin from SO here

Stoves: If you use a small saw to cut rounds you will get a longer burn time. A 7 ounce Silky does a really good job.

2 person hot tents: We have podcasts embedded to help with the decision but really it is Redcliff , Cimarron, LBO , or maybe Eolus if you really want to go light. It's a balance of space and weight and really only you can decide what is right. In general, I would say if you come from a camper or wall tent background go bigger, and if you are used to backpacking tents and like to be more mobile go smaller. For me , in general, I won't use the Redcliff until rifle seasons, I may use the Cimarron in all of the seasons, and the LBO and Eolus are more archery or early rifle. I tend to the lighter side usually. Of course, if comfort was the thing, then I would go Courthouse and have a llama.

Kevin
 
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Prerylyon

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Apr 25, 2016
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Cedar Rapids, IA
I believe that I was number 3 to test the original model. Still own two bases and a nest. Only disadvantage is not being able to stand up inside.
I'm probably thinking too much; but would a shorter tent ceiling promote greater heat retention with the stove/in general-maybe not enough to offset not being able to stand-anyone got thoughts on that?