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  1. #11
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    I've seriously considered going but eventually decided to not.
    Simply because it would only be for myself.
    I can do trips that include the whole family now for the same price. Usually fishing. But seeing how excited my grandson gets is worth more than anything.
    Just booked costa rica just over a year from now for 7 people. Which will include 2 grandsons. Looking at about 8k total for everyone. 5 adults paying makes it easy

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  2. #12
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    It's not for everyone.

    I think I'd like to go to see the critters but have no desire to shoot any of them. Was told by a guy who used to live there, to go during the rainy season to see more animals.

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  4. #13
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    The only real places that you are going to see any animals is in the National Parks. Other than that over 90% of the animals that you can hunt are going to be on farms where the primary purpose of them is to be hunted. It is sad to say but in all the public lands areas the animals have been pretty much shot off long ago.

    We took a tour from Capetown to the country of Lesotho and back to Port Elizabeth and all the wild animals that we saw were one kudu and one ostrich. Now this was in South Africa. You will also have a hard time finding any animals outside of the National Parks in Kenya and a few other countries over there. The people feel that if the animal doesn't pay for itself one way or another then they are worthless and done away with. That is why hunting is so important over there.
    If you don't care where you are, you are not lost....

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  6. #14
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    I've been to Africa three times and spent over a month of hunting days afield. With that, I've taken over 20 different species while there. There are certainly different ways to do it. If you go to destinations such as South Africa and Namibia, you can purchase a package from 5-10 animals and then hunt those animals specifically. You can also pay the daily rate and pay per animal a la carte. I've done it both ways.

    Speaking specifically about TZ, you choose a 10, 16, 21 or 28 day license. Each of these licenses then grants the hunter to hunt specific species. You will then pay on a per head basis dependent upon what you shoot. For example, if you want to kill a Lesser Kudu, then you can only shoot one of those on a 21/28 day license. I'll also say TZ is one of the most expensive countries to hunt when considering all of the countries in Africa, yet they do have some specific species only huntable in their country.

    This would be my advice to anyone considering hunting Africa: select 4-6 animals you think you want to hunt. Then, do some research on if these species are even found in the same geographical location. Select a reputable outfitter and go have a great time!!! Additionally, always carry extra cash with you because there will be an animal, or two, that you don't think you want to hunt until the day you have a monster step out in front of you and you can't resist.

    Africa is one of the most economical hunts in the world.
    "Make no mistake, it's not revenge he's after ... It's the reckoning." Doc Holliday

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  8. #15
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    I've been to Africa 5 times, 3 for work and 2 for hunting. Overseas travel is not for everyone but for some, such as myself, it can be fascinating. I always here folks comparing Alaskan hunting costs to African costs. To me that has no impact on my choosing one over another. Truth be told, I can't really afford either one. One major aspect missing to those who have never travelled to some of the "remote" countries of the world are the culture differences. The purpose of an Alaskan hunt is to kill an "X" while an African hunt may be a combination of killing an "x", "y" and some "Z's" and to also experience the African culture. It's hard to compare the two when the cost is the only factor you're looking at. Culture isn't a big deal to everyone and wasn't to me 25 years ago but I look at other places differently now and appreciate the experiences. I'd love to go back to Africa again sometime and do some more hunting but I don't know if it will ever happen. Africa's a cool place to see.

    Me and my daughter are going fishing in Alaska this summer. This will be my 5th or 6th trip up there as well...sometimes for hunting, sometimes work and sometimes fishing. Sometime in the not too distant future I'll be hunting in Alaska again as well. It's all good!

    Enjoy Africa Mr. Highplainsdrifter whether you're carrying a gun or not. Tanzania would be my first choice for hunting if not for the astronomical cost of hunting in that country. I've only stood on the Tanzanian border looking in and wished I could hunt there. Make sure you get the timing right so you can see the wildebeest migration while you're there.

    Good luck!

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  10. #16
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    One way to think of it is the "trophy Fee", as they call it over there, is your license cost. You just pay for it after you harvest. That way you only pay for the animals you take and not everything. I hope you go. It is an absolute blast. Not just the hunting but the culture, no matter what country you are in. It will make you appreciate the US a bit more when you get back. Good luck! I hope you get to #RedLine the FUN Meter!

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