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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    Maybe a little bit longer than a 10 count but everything else is spot on.
    Also, I helps to start with a doe. Marinate with itilian dressing and bread with flour. Follow the above and enjoy.
    I personally don't like to marinade or add seasonings. if meat is good why cover up it's natural flavor? if meat is not good I just won't eat it. same way I won't drink a nasty corona. not even with the help of a lime to hide it's nastiness!

    but that's just me.
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION


    tolerance of the nation ,makes the nation an obamination !

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  3. #12
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    What is interesting to me is the fact that the fast carnivores that led to a pronghorn's amazing speed in the Pleistocene died out 10,000 years ago - yet the pronghorn has remained fast enough to out-pace them. The arms race is long over yet the pronghorn has not evolved into a slower animal. Pronghorn expert John Byers has some interesting stuff to read.

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  5. #13
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    I enjoyed "Built for Speed: a Year in the Life of Pronghorn" by Byers. They learned a ton by following pronghorn year-round on the National Bison Range. I bet I'll never get to where I can identify the individual does like they did though.

    Another good book is Pronghorn Ecology & Management by O'Gara & Yoakum. It's a big one, and some of the chapters are more interesting than others (I skipped about half of the chapter describing diseases), but I learned things there that I had never found in any other books. For example I had never heard of present-day 4 horned pronghorn until I read it.

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Serio View Post
    I enjoyed "Built for Speed: a Year in the Life of Pronghorn" by Byers. They learned a ton by following pronghorn year-round on the National Bison Range. I bet I'll never get to where I can identify the individual does like they did though.

    Another good book is Pronghorn Ecology & Management by O'Gara & Yoakum. It's a big one, and some of the chapters are more interesting than others (I skipped about half of the chapter describing diseases), but I learned things there that I had never found in any other books. For example I had never heard of present-day 4 horned pronghorn until I read it.
    Thanks El Serio - I'm buying the O'Gara book.

  8. #15
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    I need to put an antelope on the table this fall, end of story
    Model 70 Classic Compact 7mm-08

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  10. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by southforkguy View Post
    i need to put an antelope on the table this fall, end of story
    git-r-dun!!!!
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION


    tolerance of the nation ,makes the nation an obamination !

  11. #17
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    Well the only goat I shot I must have cut the steaks too thin. Yuck. Maybe again some day ill give them a try.

  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustang8 View Post
    Well the only goat I shot I must have cut the steaks too thin. Yuck. Maybe again some day ill give them a try.
    To me there are several factors.
    1- Don't shoot an antelope that has been run hard. I love to shoot mine first thing in the morning or later in the day when bedded or relaxed grazing.
    2- Take care when field dressing and then cool them down immediately.
    3- Wrap meat properly when processing. Freezer burned antelope isn't good.
    4- I have been cooking a little different lately. I super slow cook whole roasts on the grill until temp comes up to 125. I then remove and get my grill up to 450. Put roast or strap back on to sear 10 seconds on each side. Then remove, wrap in foil, and let it rest for 10-15 minutes before slicing. It is by far the best wild game steak out there if handled correctly imo.
    5- When cooking meat just past rare, it won't be steaming hot. Sometimes by the time it gets to the table it isn't as hot as some people like. Easy trick to solve this is keep you dinner plates in the oven at 130?F before serving. The warm plate keeps everything at temperature much longer.
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	23319

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltop View Post
    To me there are several factors.
    1- Don't shoot an antelope that has been run hard. I love to shoot mine first thing in the morning or later in the day when bedded or relaxed grazing.
    2- Take care when field dressing and then cool them down immediately.
    3- Wrap meat properly when processing. Freezer burned antelope isn't good.
    4- I have been cooking a little different lately. I super slow cook whole roasts on the grill until temp comes up to 125. I then remove and get my grill up to 450. Put roast or strap back on to sear 10 seconds on each side. Then remove, wrap in foil, and let it rest for 10-15 minutes before slicing. It is by far the best wild game steak out there if handled correctly imo.
    5- When cooking meat just past rare, it won't be steaming hot. Sometimes by the time it gets to the table it isn't as hot as some people like. Easy trick to solve this is keep you dinner plates in the oven at 130?F before serving. The warm plate keeps everything at temperature much longer.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Antelope supper.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	14.0 KB 
ID:	23319
    Point number 1 is by far the most important in my experience. We've killed dozens over the years n the only bad ones were the runners.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  15. #20
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    Amazing animals.
    They are not prone to (immune to) CWD and many other hoofed mammal diseases.
    Can run 35 mph almost endlessly... for hours I have read.
    Beautiful.
    Great eysight!
    Delicious.
    Fffffun to hunt!
    Only native to Western North America. It is our proprietary species!
    Prefers little to no cover, which is counter to almost all other wildlife species. Instead, preferring to show off their athleticism vs. hiding.
    Just cool animals.
    Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take... but by the number of moments that take your breath away.

 

 
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