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    How far to camp?

    Hey guys! How far does everyone camp from their hunting/glassing spot if bivy hunting (or light tent)? Do you carry camp with you or leave it in place?


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    Quote Originally Posted by radencica View Post
    Hey guys! How far does everyone camp from their hunting/glassing spot if bivy hunting (or light tent)? Do you carry camp with you or leave it in place?


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    really totally depends on the area I am hunting. I have glassed from my sleeping bag. I have also driven a hundred miles and walked in a few more to get where I wanted to be.


    I have had elk bugling most of the night within a few hundred yards of where I slept.

    in GENERAL I would say, not so close you spook them from the area. how close or far that may be, is really up to you.
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION


    tolerance of the nation ,makes the nation an obamination !

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  4. #3
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    Depending upon the terrain, about a mile. That said, if you camp that far away....someone will likely set-up camp, where your elk were expected to be! Been there, done that! The pre-season scouting was wasted! memtb

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  6. #4
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    For deer, I try to hike to where most hunters can't or won't hike in the dark to get to. This has been 2 1/2 to 5 miles. The hunt starts from the moment I crawl out of the tent as I figure that we will bust more critters by traveling when we can't see well. My last deer hunt we were able to shoot two deer (on different days) from within feet of our camp. We were in the trees, and only had to creep to the edge to start hunting.
    For elk, I have to limit myself to where I would be able to do the pack-out. My last few bull hunts had all be with an outfitter for that reason. On last year's DIY cow hunt, I hiked daily from the base camp (cabin), and did pass on several cows until I found some that allowed for a downhill drag.

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  8. #5
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    A common theme I'm getting from the more experienced folks sharing their knowledge in this thread is to be flexible and adapt to what you're seeing/hearing/aware of during the hunt.

    What I'm hearing is that if you're in a good area with sign and a healthy population of elk, and you're not on them, its probably time to change the gameplan-camp location change could be part of that gameplan. It seems the whole issue with camp location and hunter pressure can be at the same time helpful and deterimental; depending on the specifics of the situation that day.

    It was interesting. I went on an outifitted backcountry hunt in 2014. The outfitter's camp was a few hours horseback ride into the National forest from a trailhead; he made it known he felt his camp location benefitted from day hunters/walk-ins/hikers pushing game to his area from the trailheads on the fringes; inbound to the more remote areas we were hunting. It seemed to hold some water as most mornings we had game coming thru coming from the direction of the trailhead entry point miles away; with the day hunters showing up a within a couple hours of the deer and elk coming through. Granted, that was a specific spot, but it was more that concept.



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  10. #6
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    Make base camp then hunt the perimeter within a few miles along trails , creek beds or ravines
    where haul out isn't a problem.(I hunt alone)
    Last edited by dirtclod Az.; 01-20-2019 at 10:06 PM.

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  12. #7
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    Day hikers had pushed three good bucks right to us around 9:00am. The bucks were well in front of the hunters, and it's likely that they never knew they were moving the deer in front of them. Last year, on a solo trip to CO, the same thing happened to me, except there were no shooters in the four deer they pushed to me.

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  14. #8
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    I always camp about a half mile or less from where the animals are. I build no fire. This way I'm right on top of the animals right at daylight. Also you don't have too get all sweaty and up so early to get to the animals.

    I've had elk bugling all night keeping me awake. Also on deer you can move in position to get a shot.

    Most hunters in my area like the nice comforts of there base camp. They always ask how I see so many animals. It's been like this for years.

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  16. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxhunter View Post
    I always camp about a half mile or less from where the animals are. I build no fire. This way I'm right on top of the animals right at daylight. Also you don't have too get all sweaty and up so early to get to the animals.

    I've had elk bugling all night keeping me awake. Also on deer you can move in position to get a shot.

    Most hunters in my area like the nice comforts of there base camp. They always ask how I see so many animals. It's been like this for years.
    Im the same. I prefer to be within 1/2 mile at most when i am camping in the hills. I also use the topography of the area to dictate things as well with where i camp and prevailing winds. I camped about a 1/4 mile from where my deer lived this summer before harvesting him, and when i killed my elk, i literally was camped right amongst them without trying. I had elk keeping me awake all night and even took some long exposure photos after setting my tent up that night and you can see elk bodies on the hill above. I shot my bull right at daybreak within 1000 yards of my camp. Different scenarios dictate things for me, but id rather be right where i want to and not worry about some other hunter being closer

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  18. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntnguide View Post
    Im the same. I prefer to be within 1/2 mile at most when i am camping in the hills. I also use the topography of the area to dictate things as well with where i camp and prevailing winds. I camped about a 1/4 mile from where my deer lived this summer before harvesting him, and when i killed my elk, i literally was camped right amongst them without trying. I had elk keeping me awake all night and even took some long exposure photos after setting my tent up that night and you can see elk bodies on the hill above. I shot my bull right at daybreak within 1000 yards of my camp. Different scenarios dictate things for me, but id rather be right where i want to and not worry about some other hunter being closer

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    What’s your thoughts on the fire/smoke smell? Ive had many, even an outfitter tell me it was no worries as there are so many campers in the mountains all year long that it alone does not deter the critters. I know of people taking whitetails here in PA very close to a small warm up fire but have never personally seen how critters respond to it.

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