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  1. #11
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    I've been hiking the trails with my frame pack loaded at 50lbs and working the hills not just the flats. It's pretty humid here so I tend to do it early AM of after sunset. I also shoot my bow with the frame pack on and or just a day pack for real situations.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 25contender View Post
    I always run till July. After that its to hot. So every July I pack train with 70lbs 3 mornings a week till season starts in September. I would much rather pack train with my Kifaru Pack than anything else.
    I gave up running, always hated it. Now I do a track and stadium stairs with 70lbs. three days a week for 30 mins. Weekends see a much lighter pack and a lot more miles, in the mountains as much as possible. No mountains? Hit trails with all the hills you can muster. I've been battling muscle and ligament injuries all summer so my weight training is way behind but staying consistent on that helps as well.

    There's no secret formula other than consistent daily workouts.

  3. #13
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    No way would I waste $300 on that..
    I do what 25Contender does, and run until about July, the just start hiking a local hill 4 times a week, with about 65-70 pounds in my pack. I have found, instead of packing my pack full of free weights, that I can stuff the bottom full of some clothes or an old pillow, then on top of that I put a 50 pound bag of seed beans in. This keeps the weight distribution more realistic, and keeps the weight off your lower back. It also completely fills out my pack, so when I cinch it down, nothing moves around.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

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  5. #14
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    Whoah 50lbs? I must be getting old. I usually scout loaded 25-ish or so and try to hunt around 20 fully loaded. That's not counting rifle, sidearm, and walking stick, but still half your load. What the heck are you carrying there? Bricks?

  6. #15
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    Squats help build the strength of the core as part of this routine, but the boards and legs rise directly to the core. Bbut even if you have a good physical shape good equipment is muct have for every hunter. Hiking equipment reviews can help to choose you good things.

  7. #16
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    I learned long ago that the best exercise for performing a particular activity is just doing that activity as much as possible. As a backpacker, or day hunter, my pack isn't all that heavy. But, I have to be capable of packing out a heavy meat load, or getting a week's worth of gear and food up a mountain, so I try to train with up to 60#. I have a good 3 mile loop with some elevation change right out my door, so I gear up and have been adding weight and try to beat my best time. Right now, I'm at 43# and 48 minutes. I'm not going to go that fast out west, but it's the best that I can do to train for the altitude.

  8. #17
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    I do a lot of weighted pack training and increase the weight as it gets closer to the hunting season. Check out the training bags at www.onustraining.com. They are leak-proof, made to go in your hunting pack, and easy to adjust the weight as needed. The intent is to train with your existing pack and not have to use random objects or leaking bags of sandn that are hard on our packs. They have a max of 100lb bag and a smaller max of 50lbs.

  9. #18
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    Don't spend money on an additional pack that you're not going to hunt with. Take whatever hunting pack you own and load that thing up. I use "The MULE" at www.onustraining.com in my BC Guide Gear Talon frame. It's leak-proof, made to go in your hunting pack, easy to adjust the weight as needed, inexpensive, and isn't hard on your pack. I was sick of getting creative with odd objects to get the weight I wanted. They have a max of 100lb bag and a smaller max of 50lbs.

 

 
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