Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Two Harbors, Minnesota
    Posts
    829
    Thanks
    266
    Thanked 321 Times in 240 Posts
    Congratulations
    510
    Congratulated 97 Times in 16 Posts

    I agree that it isn't so much the distance that you travel, but more the terrain that is traversed while doing so. Use an established trail to get you started if necessary, but once you do some bush-wacking or travel thru country where horses can't go you will leave most everyone else including outfitters behind. Do keep in mind that you have to come back out, and hopefully while packing out the remnants of the critter that you shot. Do your due diligence to ensure that there isn't some other easy way into the spot that you are accessing the hard way, or it may just be wasted effort on your part.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    1,914
    Thanks
    623
    Thanked 878 Times in 570 Posts
    Congratulations
    345
    Congratulated 92 Times in 31 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by RICMIC View Post
    I agree that it isn't so much the distance that you travel, but more the terrain that is traversed while doing so. Use an established trail to get you started if necessary, but once you do some bush-wacking or travel thru country where horses can't go you will leave most everyone else including outfitters behind. Do keep in mind that you have to come back out, and hopefully while packing out the remnants of the critter that you shot. Do your due diligence to ensure that there isn't some other easy way into the spot that you are accessing the hard way, or it may just be wasted effort on your part.


    ha. been there ,done that a couple times.

    nothing worse then hiking up a steep arse hill and finding a fourwheeler at the top
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    N.E. LA
    Posts
    305
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 71 Times in 62 Posts
    Congratulations
    16
    Congratulated 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DDGOOSE676 View Post
    I spent last year in Colorado's units 18 and 37 2nd rifle season trying to learn to hunt mule deer. I.ve never been there before and didn't know where to start. I got boots on the ground and found what i thought was a good buck and took him home on the second day. My original plan was to backpack way back and spend time glassing but after i located my buck near my camp i couldn't be persuaded to go further back. I now have ?'s. What is a mule deers preferred habitat ? Should i spend time in the "High country" for 2nd rifle ? Should i be looking more in the dark timber ? Is a 4th rifle season a better opportunity ? for GMU 18 37.
    'Your Buck' was where he was for a reason. It would probably be a good idea to analyze that area and see what type of habitat /vegetation / cover was there. Also, there is a fair chance that there may have been other bucks in that area that you may not have seen, or another buck may begin using that area.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Reno Nv
    Posts
    7,967
    Thanks
    2,876
    Thanked 1,752 Times in 1,231 Posts
    Congratulations
    755
    Congratulated 764 Times in 128 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by DDGOOSE676 View Post
    Also how far do most people go back when they backpack ? I've found several off the road spots that are 7 or more miles back. How likely will it be to run into another hunter there ?
    Just a mile or 2 can make a big difference
    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

 

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •