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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RICMIC View Post
    I love having a fire after we're tagged out or headed off the mountain the next morning. I never have a fire until then when I am coyoteing out. Attachment 21150
    That looks amazing RICMIC! I'm sitting here in a blizzard right now wishing I was in that picture.

    Sent from my SM-G928V using Tapatalk

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  3. #12
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    Base camp always has a fire going when we are there, spike camp has one sometimes depending on how tired I am. IMO it doesnt make or break a hunt, just adds a little backcountry comfort. Ive watched deer and elk feed next to a spike camp fire. If they dont see (you) or smell (you) then your golden.

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  5. #13
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    When I was in Kentucky elk hunting, we had a fire in camp all the time. One night we came back to camp and my dad said that he thought there was a bear in the creek behind camp nosing around. He said that right at dark, he started cooking supper and he started hearing splashing and cracking right behind the tent. He just kept cooking and didn't think much of it, but we cautiously walked behind the tent with flashlights and much to our surprise, there was a bull elk tangled in the saplings less than 30 yards behind our wall tent! Apparently the bull had gotten his antlers entangled in a long piece of coaxial TV cable, which became entangled with a dead tree, then wrapped around a cluster of standing trees. The bull was effectively tied to a tree 30 yards from where we had slept for a week, while I had been hunting far and wide with out so much as a bull sighting!!! Long story short, the DNR came the next morning while I was out hunting and shot the bull, took the antlers, which had been broken at the base from the twisting of the cable tighter and tighter, and told us we could have the meat. Although the bull was only 30 yards away initially, when they moved close to shoot it, it uprooted the trees it was tangled in, and ran straight up hill about 2-3 hundred yards, so we had to quarter and pack the bull back to camp! I ended up getting a dandy bull 2 days later, so we got to bring home 2 elk for the freezer! Definitely one of the strangest things that has ever happened to me while on a hunt!

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  8. #14
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    I have never had a fire in a coyote type situation. I’ve always felt it was a bad idea because the animals would smell the smoke and know something was different and keep them more alert.

    Base camp away from hunting area we have had fires sometimes.
    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

  9. #15
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    I would think the activity around a camp even in the back country where no humans have been for 7-8 months would alert game more than a fire. I'm sure they smell fires all the time from campers, hikers and wildfires.
    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

  10. #16
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    My father always kept us away from the campfire when hunting.Then we came to the realization there were campfires all over the mountains and the game were somewhat used to it during hunting season.

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  12. #17
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    Where animals are conserned I have found that they are quite curious and want to find out where that smoke smell or some noises are coming from.

    I have had mule deer walk into a grove of trees where I have been using a chainsaw. All I can figure out is that they want to see what that noise is. Also as other have mentioned the smell of smoke is a natural occurrence in the woods. Either from campers, hikers, someone that is trying to dry out their socks or forest fires. I along with others have figured out that one of the best places to hunt deer and elk is a area that has been burnt. I have seen elk and deer move into these type of area right after it quit burning and still smoldering, and the smell of smoke is very heavy.
    If you don't care where you are, you are not lost....

  13. #18
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    Fires naturally accrue in the woods and the smell is not foreign to animals that live there i have had a small fires and only when its out of sight Im no expert but i have not noticed and change in there behavior now my SNORING might alarm anything within a mile
    Trying like hell to live the dream,Nomad

  14. #19
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    Nothing against a campfire. Have done a few. I'm not worried about spooking game although that's interesting topic in itself.
    I don't like the smell it leaves on my clothing so I tend to avoid them.

  15. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dustin ray View Post
    Fires naturally accrue in the woods and the smell is not foreign to animals that live there i have had a small fires and only when its out of sight Im no expert but i have not noticed and change in there behavior now my SNORING might alarm anything within a mile
    Alta Loma, CA. Nice area to grow up. Spent a few years there.

 

 
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