Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 49
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    35
    Thanked 10 Times in 5 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    The Long Shot... Take it or Leave it?

    Hey guys,

    With all these DIY videos coming out on YouTube, there's an increasing exposure to the world of hunting for sportsmen and non-sportsmen, alike. That being said, one thing that I keep coming across in these videos is hunters taking shots that range between 400-700 yards. Some of those animals are dead on impact and others take one, two, and even three more shots to go down.
    As an open country hunter myself, I understand that sometimes a 600-yard shot is the only opportunity that presents itself in the course of a hunt. But I've always told myself I would never take a shot past 300 yards for a few reasons: 1) It makes me feel like I'm not "sniping" an animal and that it was a fair hunt, 2) I feel like there's less risk for destroying meat, and 3) It makes the hunt more challenging. While I aknowledge that one of the primary reasons for hunting should be for the purpose of getting meat, are all kills created equal? The question I would like to pose to you all is this:

    EVEN IF YOU CAN CONFIDENTLY SHOOT LONG DISTANCES, IS IT THE RIGHT THING TO DO?

    I'm biased towards saying no, but I want to hear your guys' opinions! Looking forwards to reading the comments!
    Last edited by BHunt98; 03-11-2018 at 03:42 PM.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BHunt98 For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,966
    Thanks
    829
    Thanked 551 Times in 414 Posts
    Congratulations
    1,012
    Congratulated 245 Times in 53 Posts
    Ethics, some people have them and some don't. At what point does does actual hunting of an animal simply become shooting at a live target 600-1000+ yards away?
    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

    Cree Prophecy

  4. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Gr8bawana For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Carlin, NV
    Posts
    1,113
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 234 Times in 198 Posts
    Congratulations
    408
    Congratulated 153 Times in 20 Posts
    I kind of sit on both sides of the fence. The only chance I will take a shot between 400-600 yards is if the animal knowingly knows I am there and is about to bolt. On top of that, this said animal will need to be pretty darn big. I feel that after a few seasons of archery hunting,1 kill on 177" buck at 20 yards, and a few kills with a muzzleloader under 100 yards under my belt I am more than capable enough to close the distance to less than 300 yards without being detected. I feel long shots when the animal doesn't know you are there is not giving the animal the fair chance at evading my pursuit. Just my 2 cents.

  6. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to tdub24 For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Reno Nv
    Posts
    8,073
    Thanks
    2,922
    Thanked 1,783 Times in 1,256 Posts
    Congratulations
    776
    Congratulated 778 Times in 131 Posts
    I think you should get as close as possible when taking a shot. If that is 600 yards you should be able to to put the bullet in the correct spot every time you pull the trigger regardless of conditions. To do that you must practice a lot, have the correct equipment and KNOW you can make the kill with one bullet.

    IMO I think most shots will be less then 300 yards if you really try to get as close as possible.
    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

  8. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Ikeepitcold For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Dolores, Colorado
    Posts
    5,316
    Thanks
    1,441
    Thanked 2,137 Times in 1,214 Posts
    Congratulations
    307
    Congratulated 396 Times in 100 Posts
    I can routinely shoot minute or less groups out to 500 yards with both my .25-06 & .300 Wby. The longest shot I have ever taken was a one shot kill on a buck antelope that was slightly over 400 yards away. I had hunted this particular animal for 4 days and just couldn't get closer. He was smart and I finally ran out of patience.

    I have shot a lot of deer at 300 to 350 with no problems. But I just won't shoot any further for a variety of reasons. The variables (especially wind) get greater and I don't want to be chasing down a wounded animal.

    I've seen the tv shows that shoot animals across canyons at extreme ranges (600, 700 and more). They never show how many they miss or cripple. Not for me............
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA, NRA certified Range Safety Officer, Pistol Instructor, Rifle Instructor, RMEF, Boone & Crockett Club.
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  10. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Colorado Cowboy For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    2,008
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 931 Times in 607 Posts
    Congratulations
    364
    Congratulated 93 Times in 32 Posts
    I personally will not take a shot over 400. just no longer feel confident enough in my ability or eyesight to do it.
    in fact,I doubt most hunters have the ability to do so.
    besides for me, half the fun is in getting close and seldom have I encountered a situation where it was not possible to get that close.

    that said .., there are many who DO have the ability . for those who do , kudos to them and congrats.

    I will not fault those who do it but would say ,"just because you can , does not ALWAYS mean you should."

    every situation is different and I believe whatever ones capability may be ,if the hunter respects his(her) prey ,they owes it to the animal to to try and get into position for the , best shot they can.
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION

  12. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to kidoggy For This Useful Post:


  13. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    35
    Thanked 10 Times in 5 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Really neat that you have experience hunting with all three weapons! I'm curious as to whether people's mindsets about "the hunt" and "the kill" change based off of the weapon they hold in their hands

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BHunt98 For This Useful Post:


  15. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    idaho
    Posts
    2,008
    Thanks
    661
    Thanked 931 Times in 607 Posts
    Congratulations
    364
    Congratulated 93 Times in 32 Posts
    many have a mindset that is different from mine.

    doesn't necessarily mean I am right and they are not ,or vice versa.

    not everyone wants the same thing out of a hunt.
    for some it's only the kill that matters. for some it's getting the meat.for some it's the trophy . for some it doesn't even matter if they kill anything or not, it's simply about being in nature and testing themselves.(my favorite hunts these days is not even when I have the tag. it's taking a new hunter out for their first hunts.)IT IS A CHALLENGE AND A RUSH TO HELP A NEWBIE SUCCEED.

    and probably, for most, it's about all of those combined.

    my priorities change somewhat based upon what tag I manage to draw and how full my freezer is. mostly, for me, the meat is the most important thing but there are certain hunts that getting that trophy takes precedent over wether I fill the freezer or not.in those type hunts one should always be content to eat tag soup. if you are one to get bummed later, about passing on an animal, you should not trophy hunt
    Last edited by kidoggy; 03-11-2018 at 06:59 PM.
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to kidoggy For This Useful Post:


  17. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Gypsum, Co
    Posts
    2,147
    Thanks
    126
    Thanked 871 Times in 609 Posts
    Congratulations
    52
    Congratulated 214 Times in 47 Posts
    Having hunted in the west my whole life with cross canyon shots can get up there in yardage I will say it all depends. Nice way of avoiding the question isn't it?

    I would say that the vast majority of my shots at animals have been under 300 yards with most of them in the 100-200 yard range but there have been a couple that pushed the envelope past 700 yards. One was a elk and the other was a mule deer. On both of them I knew what my rifle was capable of along with myself and didn't hesitate to take the shots. The elk took two shots with both of them being kill shots but after the first shot he was still standing and I have the philosophy that if a elk is still on his feet then I am going to keep shooting. The other 700 yard+ shot was at a mule deer standing at the far end of a hay field with no way to get closer with only 1/2 hour left in the season. He dropped as soon as the bullet hit him. Both shots were taken from a dead rest with no wind, if the wind would of been blowing I never would of pulled the trigger on either shot, just too many variables.

    The coues deer in my avatar was shot at 420 yards and if any of you have hunted those grey ghost you know that is a close shot most of the time.

    Other than that I also like to hunt with a pistol. Where a 150 yard shot is way out there but again I have taken those shots with confidence that I was going to hit the animal, I have also passed those same kind of shots depending on what is happening.

    So in the grand scheme of things I think that 90% of those kind of shots depend on where you are hunting. Wide open country requires long shots usually. I don't agree with some of these shows out there that push the limits of their equipment to the extreme and you know that with it being shown on TV that you will never see the ones that were hit and never recovered. They also add to problems with hunters that want to push the yardage out there without the practice or skill to do so. I have a relative that is this way. He thinks that all he needs is a scope with a turret installed on it to where he can just dial in the distance, place the cross-hairs on the target and pull the trigger. There are times that I wished that it was that easy.
    If you don't care where you are, you are not lost....

  18. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to JimP For This Useful Post:


  19. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    407
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 390 Times in 137 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 73 Times in 24 Posts

    Lots of other variables to consider before pulling the trigger, with distance only being one of them.

    The real "skill" is knowing when to, and when not to, depending on each situation.

    Honestly, given favorable conditions, a good rest and a rifle you know and shoot well...300-500 really isn't any big deal. Crap rest, wind, bad light, animal that's jittery, etc...150 yards may be too far.

  20. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to BuzzH For This Useful Post:


 

 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •