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  1. #11
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    I do believe in the success rates in California. If you do not submit your harvest report by a certain day you get charged a fee ($20-$25 I think?). I would think many people wouldn't want to pay that and just simply go online and click a few buttons to avoid it. And having hunted the same unit the last 4 years, I believe in the 3% success rate! Haha

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  4. #12
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    Harvest rates tell you very little. It is not uncommon for people to buy tags but never go hunting or buy a tag and never leave their vehicle. I know a guy who drew WY deer area 87 but never went out to fill it.

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  6. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskabound2016 View Post
    I do believe in the success rates in California. If you do not submit your harvest report by a certain day you get charged a fee ($20-$25 I think?). I would think many people wouldn't want to pay that and just simply go online and click a few buttons to avoid it. And having hunted the same unit the last 4 years, I believe in the 3% success rate! Haha

    Nv is $50 and I think you may not be able to apply for tag the following year.
    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

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  8. #14
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    I agree with what you guys are saying about the nuances between specific states data. That is something to consider.

    My thing, I guess really, was seeing animals in what last year I might have considered lousy units- just by the numbers alone in the papers.

    I didn't get my freezer queen this year, but I was on them and had fresh sign daily. I think if me and my partner had pushed just a little harder we'd have punched our tags.

    My short term plan is spend the next few years in that country. After a few years learning it, I'll decide on trying someplace new- but plan to hunt WY again if I pull that tag-otherwise I'll hunt the south side in the CO country. I saw plenty of nice deer on both sides too. Might cash in my WY points if I dont draw an elk tag-I just want to get out there.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

  9. #15
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    Like so many have said before....no substitute for boots on the ground.
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  11. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtm307 View Post
    Harvest rates tell you very little. It is not uncommon for people to buy tags but never go hunting or buy a tag and never leave their vehicle. I know a guy who drew WY deer area 87 but never went out to fill it.
    This.. I put no stock in harvest rates, I've seen how some people 'hunt' their tags.. Herd sizes, bull to cow ratio, total tags/total area.. these are things I look at.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

  12. #17
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    Over the years we have hunted the same area here in NV for 2 bulls and 4 cows, we were only unsuccessful on one, my first cow tag and only because I missed my only shot.
    That area usually has a success rate of 16-18 % for cows and less than 50% for bulls. We are 100% on 2 bull tags and 75% on cows. I think those are pretty good percentages compared to the average success rate of the area.
    I can only speak of my own experience here in NV and I like to think it's because we are willing to work harder than most other hunters.
    Here in NV the hardest part is just drawing the tag. To me success rates have no bearing on my area choices.
    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

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  13. #18
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    Since we usually hunt an out of state and rarely hunt a unit more than once or twice, I'm always considering the harvest success when selecting a spot to go. With that said I don't just take things at face value.

    Antelope: On a quality antelope hunt with tons of animals, success rates should run north of 80%-85%. if success is own under something like 70% I figure this is an area that will take some effort to get a buck, and is likely not a slam dunk to see a ton of antelope in that area. I would want to do a lot more research on that area.

    Deer and elk: I have been in high demand trophy units with lots of animals and still see guys who won't leave their ATV. I don't care where you hunt, other than a couple extremely glassable units I can think of, where bulls can be easily found from roads. When we elk hunt, I know we will put in a lot of effort. For these tags, I tend to take the success rate, double it and figure that is roughly our chance to kill a bull. For example if the elk harvest rate is 25% I figure we have about even odds of killing a bull. Like IKIC said, I like looking at antler point data as well if available. Another thing to consider is that if there are very low tag numbers for a hunt, you might see wide swings in harvest success for no other reason than only a certain percentage of the hunters report and the sample size is low. Also the lower the motivation to put out efforts, like on an antlerless tag, the more the harvest can be biased low.

    Once In A Lifetime Trophy Species (sheep, mountain goat, moose, etc): I think the harvest stats tend to be much more accurate on these since there isn't the motivation to falsify reporting (people who don't want others hunting their "spot") and the reporting requirements tend to be more stringent. Again I look at data that quantifies the antler or horn configuration as well.
    Last edited by Umpqua Hunter; 12-29-2017 at 12:10 PM.

  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtm307 View Post
    Harvest rates tell you very little. It is not uncommon for people to buy tags but never go hunting or buy a tag and never leave their vehicle. I know a guy who drew WY deer area 87 but never went out to fill it.
    Whenever possible, the MRS calculates our own success rates based on the reported figure for the estimated number of hunters that actually hunted the unit rather than the number of tags sold. Also, success rates in the state harvest reports often refer to total success and we prefer to use success on bucks and bulls which means we have to calculate it.

  15. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    Since we usually hunt an out of state and rarely hunt a unit more than once or twice, I'm always considering the harvest success when selecting a spot to go. With that said I don't just take things at face value.

    Antelope: On a quality antelope hunt with tons of animals, success rates should run north of 80%-85%. if success is own under something like 70% I figure this is an area that will take some effort to get a buck, and is likely not a slam dunk to see a ton of antelope in that area. I would want to do a lot more research on that area.

    Deer and elk: I have been in high demand trophy units with lots of animals and still see guys who won't leave their ATV. I don't care where you hunt, other than a couple extremely glassable units I can think of, where bulls can be easily found from roads. When we elk hunt, I know we will put in a lot of effort. For these tags, I tend to take the success rate, double it and figure that is roughly our chance to kill a bull. For example if the elk harvest rate is 25% I figure we have about even odds of killing a bull. Like IKIC said, I like looking at antler point data as well if available. Another thing to consider is that if there are very low tag numbers for a hunt, you might see wide swings in harvest success for no other reason than only a certain percentage of the hunters report and the sample size is low. Also the lower the motivation to put out efforts, like on an antlerless tag, the more the harvest can be biased low.

    Once In A Lifetime Trophy Species (sheep, mountain goat, moose, etc): I think the harvest stats tend to be much more accurate on these since there isn't the motivation to falsify reporting (people who don't want others hunting their "spot") and the reporting requirements tend to be more stringent. Again I look at data that quantifies the antler or horn configuration as well.
    Agree with you on trophy species where you are required to check the animal.

    I would like to see every state require reports from every hunter and penalize hunters that don't send in their report, which some states do. However, most statistics in whatever field these days are based on sampling rather than calling every person, and in most surveys not everyone answers honestly. It's not that statistics are worthless, you just have to understand how data is collected, how much is collected and where inaccuracies are liable to come up and why. Because most news is headline news and these kinds of details are not mentioned, the spin the reporter puts on it may be way off. It's one of my pet peeves.

 

 
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