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  1. #1
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    Backpack hunting advice

    I'm looking to do a backpack hunt with a buddy possibly in a year or two. Looking at bow hunting. I haven't narrowed an area down yet but am working on that, I applied for points in Montana and Wyoming.

    I am sure there are other posts on here already but here goes anyways.

    What's the best advice you can offer up to someone getting into backpack hunting?

    Thanks

    Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    I started a thread similar to this a while back. Here is the link.

    http://forum.eastmans.com/showthread...ckpack-archery
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  3. #3
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    Oh, and the best advice I have for you is to get the necessities and just get out there. I may not have the best stuff, and neither do my hunting buddies, but we get out there and have been able to get into animals. That, and just be mentally tough.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  4. #4
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    Great advise^^^

    Do your research and keep your weight down.
    Buy the lightest equipment you can afford and don't skimp on your boots and socks. Wear boots that fit you, the only way to know is to try them on. Boots that fit someone perfectly may not fit you.
    Water purification is a must also.


    Good luck
    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

  5. #5
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    Do a few dry runs close to home, even if just overnighters here and there. You'll figure out what you really need to bring and what can be left at home.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdcour View Post
    I started a thread similar to this a while back. Here is the link.

    http://forum.eastmans.com/showthread...ckpack-archery
    That's the thread I was looking for last night, somehow I missed it.

    Thanks guys

    Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    So I have a few minutes this morning to write down a few thoughts on this and I am sure a lot of guys will chime in. The other thread has a ton of info but my guess is that it won't hurt to have this in more than one place.

    Boots- This is one area you will want to make sure that you buy the best you can afford with proper fit. Try on a bunch, treat the ones you buy. Boots can make or break your hunt.

    Archery- Practice makes perfect. I will suck up my pride and admit that I missed a good bull this year with my bow and I practiced regularly. The shot was very much inside my effective range but misses happen. Even to the guys that have steel in their vanes like Brian Barney. I may have him comment on this thread...

    Get In Shape- Elevation is a butt kicker, even for those of us who live here. Once you have your pack load it full of all of your gear and then start walking. Yes, I am a meat head and do all sorts of lifting, etc. Nothing replaces miles, once you get 6-8 miles back your lifting won't matter that much, but your endurance will. The ability to recover is what matters and nothing does that better than burning boot leather.

    Glass- Archery hunting the West is about intercepting animals. This means you use glass to find them, pattern them, and set up the stalk. Glassing with optics that you can see well at long distances makes all the difference.

    Planning- Build a solid plan on where you are going to hunt. Scout ahead of time. Mike's books are the best resource I have found for animal behavior and partnered with the MRS you can build a plan to backpack hunt regularly.
    www.eastmans.com
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  9. #8
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    Once you find everything you like or plan on carrying load it up and take a short trip and reevaluate that you like your set-up, if so go again further. If still happy ,then next go around add some extra weight(like packing some meat) just to make sure your reality and expectations are coming together with understanding of how it will all feel together. This helped me. And have fun, cause what's better than getting away......

  10. #9
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    Get out and just do it. Build the experience , learn from othesr and adjust to what works well for you.

    Set expectations. Its takes in my opinion 5 years to really learn an area and be successful there consistently.

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  12. #10
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    Bump this one up again.
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