Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Shot angle

  1. #1
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Reno Nv
    Posts
    8,138
    Thanks
    2,944
    Thanked 1,804 Times in 1,272 Posts
    Congratulations
    785
    Congratulated 781 Times in 131 Posts

    Shot angle

    This photo of Brian Barney got me thinking about shot angle.

    I'm pretty new to archery and haven't had much practice shooting angles. And tips for me and staying accurate while shooting steep angles?

    I go to the Mountains to loose my mind and find my soul.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,557
    Thanks
    292
    Thanked 823 Times in 410 Posts
    Congratulations
    116
    Congratulated 68 Times in 16 Posts
    Practice, practice, practice. Shoot from a tree stand at different distances and different directions. It's helpful if you have more than one target. Do 3D shoots. If you have steep enough hills nearby, practice shooting uphill too. For longer distances make sure your rangefinder compensates for angles.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to hoshour For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Check your bubble. Get a range finder that has angle compensation. Shot total archery challenge with a leupold rx1000 TBR DNA and had no problems on any of the angled shots. It was spot on. Keep in mind most only have angle compensation out to a certain distance, usually 100 or 125 yards.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to big44a4 For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    948
    Thanks
    186
    Thanked 73 Times in 62 Posts
    Congratulations
    16
    Congratulated 21 Times in 7 Posts
    A range finder will tell you the shot distance nowadays... or the aim like it's.... X yardage.

    Essentially, the X distance regardless of site distance is the shoot for distance.

  7. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Eastern Nebraska
    Posts
    2,551
    Thanks
    1,868
    Thanked 1,107 Times in 730 Posts
    Congratulations
    618
    Congratulated 572 Times in 77 Posts
    All advice above is solid. Form is very important as well. Bend at the waist and keep anchor point and upper body form consistent.

  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,009
    Thanks
    215
    Thanked 254 Times in 189 Posts
    Congratulations
    251
    Congratulated 96 Times in 17 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltop View Post
    All advice above is solid. Form is very important as well. Bend at the waist and keep anchor point and upper body form consistent.
    This is key. Bending at the waist vs just dropping your arm is huge for accuracy.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  9. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi there,
    You can see many archers fall into the same trap of practicing the same shot over and over. Quickly pull out the target and shoot a couple arrows on their flat lawn they call it practice.
    If you are only shooting your bow there is no accuracy. Without a good anchor point, you can’t stay accurate. Question is, how do you find a good anchor point? Get out and practice and practice. You can get up into a tree stand or even the top of your garage or shed to practice different shooting angles that way.
    Ruth J. Smith

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    562
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 166 Times in 100 Posts
    Congratulations
    16
    Congratulated 162 Times in 14 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltop View Post
    All advice above is solid. Form is very important as well. Bend at the waist and keep anchor point and upper body form consistent.
    Yep this is probably one of the biggest accuracy killer.

  11. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    180
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 49 Times in 35 Posts
    Congratulations
    7
    Congratulated 14 Times in 2 Posts

    All angled shots, for archery or firearms, will produce high impacts if you don't account for the angle. The greater the angle the greater your error.

    Gravity is the force that pulls the arrow or bullet down. When your projectile is moving horizontally, as opposed to moving at an up or down angle, then gravity pulls the projectile straight down for the entire horizontal distance. When the projectile is moving at a inclined or declined angle then you have to calculate the related horizontal distance rather than the straight line of sight distance. The line of sight distance (the distance of a line drawn from the shooter's eye to the target) is the same as the hypotenuse of a triangle (always the longest leg of a triangle) but the actual projectile drop is calculated by measuring the length of the horizontal leg of the triangle.

    I only shoot firearms and for a rifle you don't have to worry about angled shots too much unless you are aiming up or down by 25 degrees or more and the range exceeds 400 yards or so. Time of flight has an effect on how much error you will experience, faster projectiles will have less error so I'd assume that arrows, being slower than bullets, will suffer more from this issue, especially at longer ranges.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •