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Thread: Elevation

  1. #11
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    I shoot a 30-06, 165 grain Hornady and have a Leupold with the B&C reticle. I have shot extensively at low and high elevations. My home in Nebraska is about 1500' in elevation. At home, my rifle zeroed at 200 is hitting almost exactly on mark for the 300,400, and 500 yard crosshairs. At elevation- approximately 9000', my zero at 200 is still fairly close but I gain close to 50 yards on my next crosshairs. The crosshair zeros become approximately 330, 440, and 550. I believe the difference is a combination of elevation, temperature, and humidity. Even with the past experience, I still take the time to shoot and verify at elevation before each hunt.

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  3. #12
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    I think that op was talking more about the bullet after it left the muzzle. I know with the custom turrets, that you can have built for your scopes, they want to know the muzzle velocity, as well as others, to base your turret dial on. I had never really given a thought on the powder burn when you are going up in elevation. Would this matter much? I know for every 1000' of elevation you lose 2% of oxygen available ( or something like that ), Does that really affect the powder burn and how fast your bullet leaves the muzzle?

  4. #13
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    I live at 1200 feet elevation and hunt quite a bit around 9k. I really noticed the difference years back shooting rock chucks at extended ranges with my 243. I think it's worth shooting at elevation if you intend to shoot far like others have said. 500 yards might be fine but I sure wouldn't want to try 600 without having zeroed at elevation.

    I like to check my rifle anyway if at all possible after hauling it across the country. I'll usually try to set up a fresh painted portable gong as close to my hunting elevation as I can somewhere it won't affect my hunt or the hunts of others. I can usually find a spot on BLM on the way into the mountains I hunt. My scope has a dual turret set-up where I have one set up for 1200ft elevation and the other set for 8000ft. I'll make sure the 8k turret is zeroed correctly. I'm not a long range hunter although I enjoy practicing at long range. I like to be able to shoot 600 yards if the conditions are good enough, but I have only reached that far once on game.

    Probably not an issue for the OP with his set-up inside 500.

  5. #14
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    At 9-10k feet in elevation, shooting 500 yards I am off by almost 10" from my normal impact at 1500' elevation. That is with a 30-06 that doesn't shoot near as flat as the OPs selection but if my math is correct, the OP is looking at around a 6" difference in impact point. That can be a significant difference on an animal. My recommendation to anyone changing elevation by more than a couple thousand feet is to verify.

 

 
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