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  1. #1
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    What's your secret to bowhunting open country?

    I'm planning on bowhunting mule deer up high again this year. It's very open country, usually steep with a breeze blowing. But it's the only spot I know I can find deer.

    As a relatively new hunter, and even newer bow hunter, I'm wondering how do you guys hunt in this situation? What's your process when you spot a deer?

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    The above picture shows the type of terrain, but sometimes there's not even that much cover.

  2. #2
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    Watch them until they bed......wait for the thermals to switch and be consistent.......sneak into their bedroom with your boots off......make the shot when it counts.
    BOHNTR )))----------->

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOHNTR View Post
    Watch them until they bed......wait for the thermals to switch and be consistent.......sneak into their bedroom with your boots off......make the shot when it counts.
    Sounds so simple on paper doesn't it? Haha, usually just watch where they bed if you can, then sneak in there as quietly as possible. Sometimes if they go into a thick set of trees, I will try and watch it from a couple hundred yards in the evening. When I see which direction they head I try and ambush them. Had success with that last year.
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  4. #4
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    As everybody else has said, put them to bed. Once they have settled in for 20 minutes or so I being to plan my stalk, looking for any type of route in that allows cover, drainage, ridge, rocks or brush/trees to hide my approach. Boots off works best for me, thick "sneaking socks" slows me down. Patience is very important, rush and they bust!

  5. #5
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    Pick the route you plan to stalk and pick out several reference points. It will look totally different as you stalk and it's easy to lose the their location. You will make mistakes so practice on does or small bucks when ever possible. Use every opportunity to learn from the mistakes. Stalk them to the point of drawing your bow just like you planned on shooting. There are so many ways to screw up a stalk and experience is what you learn from. Patience always.
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  6. #6
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    You need to read Dwight Schuh's book, "Hunting Open Country Mule Deer."

    http://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Open-C.../dp/0912299231

  7. #7
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    What he said!
    Quote Originally Posted by BOHNTR View Post
    Watch them until they bed......wait for the thermals to switch and be consistent.......sneak into their bedroom with your boots off......make the shot when it counts.

  8. #8
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    I wish I had that much cover! Here are some examples of what I have been hunting in SD the last few years. I've been 50% with the bow since I started out there. For me, I try to get to where I can watch them bed, stalk in close, and wait for them to move into my shooting lane. I've also had success with just sneaking up on them and shooting in their bed. My buddy got a chance at one last year during the rut where we cut the buck off in it's travel route. My biggest piece of advice, be ready for anything. The lay of the land, wind speed, direction, and the direction the buck is facing (along with his companions) will all play a role. I've belly crawled through grass, cut wheat, hands and knees through a ditch, pretty much everything. The buck I shot last year in Kansas took me 12 hours to stalk. He would bed, I would stalk, get stuck, and he would leave over and over again. Biggest thing is that I stopped when I ran out of plays and didn't spook him. You will be surprised at how you can sneak up on a buck in that terrain.



    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  9. #9
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    if you know some hills that are a fav for the bucks to be feeding on in late eve with sun at ur back, stay low and keep glassing above brush and grass looking for antlers then work your way down. may sound to good to be true but ive had alot of fun doing this. works pretty darn good. they cant see ya and if ya have a cross wind you are golden, and usualy in those wide open places like that thermals dont exactly play the science game as solid as they do in the timber covered mountains.

  10. #10
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    Thanks, you guys make it sound so simple! Probably the key for me is to know when NOT to push it. And to spend more time hunting so I can get more experience, but that's a challenge of it's own.

 

 

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