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  1. #11
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    lots and lots of factory loads, I do not reload. I did have a guy load some up for me a few years back, but that was only 40 rounds.
    I did not notice the gun doing this until very recently.

    The gunsmith measured the cases and said they usually grow in length, not width, But mine are growing in width. I don't know all the detail questions, I just know I was told it is unsafe to shoot. He then went into a lot of over my head stuff. I don't reload for a reason, I am not a detail oriented person.


    I have always wanted a nosler m48, I guess here is my chance.

  2. #12
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    A case growing in width suggests an over size chamber, the sticky bolt too much pressure. Still makes no sense. A too large chamber would be very hard on brass, but I'd not expect it to make the bolt stick. I'd send it to Ruger with some fired cases...see what they find, and buy the Nosler M-48.

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  4. #13
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    I don't know exactly what was said by your gunsmith but claiming that a bigger diameter case changed your headspace isn't possible, headspace is a length dimension not a diameter.

    1000 rounds is a pretty low round count to have destroyed a barrel, it can be done with hot/fast loads but I find it difficult to believe with factory ammo. Additionally, I don't know how you are defining a burned out barrel, what has happened that made you think that you had a problem? Did your groups grow or was it simply the sticking bolt that made you go to the gunsmith? Usually it's the bench rest guys that claim this kind of low round count has ruined their barrel and that's because they are worried about groups measured to the nearest 0.100" while most of us are more concerned about groups that are plus or minus a half inch or so, about 5 times less accurate than a bench rest shooter is concerned with.

    Cases slide free from the chamber due to a slight taper in the case diameter and there being a certain amount of friction so the only things that can prevent the case from extracting smoothly is if the taper isn't properly matched to the chamber and/or there is too much friction between the case and the chamber. If the case head is expanding too much with factory ammo then the only possible cause is for the chamber to have swollen and that can only happen if the metal of the chamber moved. The metal can move either due to poor metallurgical properties (bad barrel from the factory) or possibly because of too hot of a load being used. When metal is over stressed (by too hot of a load for example) it is pushed beyond it's capability to return to it's original size and/or shape which weakens the metal, this can also create stress fractures. When the metal weakens it will loose it's ability to resist stretching so maybe those handloads you used might have been too hot and they might have caused just enough damage that the chamber has been slowly stretching to the point where now the chamber is becoming so large in diameter that the cases are sticking. This might lead to a catastrophic failure of the metal of the receiver which could rupture.

    Personally I'd send the rifle to Ruger and have it checked by their people and, if possible, have them screw on a new barrel. Regardless, I'd get the barrel replaced.
    Last edited by rammont; 02-07-2018 at 04:12 PM.

  5. #14
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    I stopped back at the gunsmith and it is the chamber, that is allowing the cases to grow in width.
    Why this has started to happen, I have no idea. The gunsmith just said that short mags just have a much shorter life than other cartridges.

    Thanks everyone.

  6. #15
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    Like I said earlier...send it to Ruger.
    Colorado Cowboy
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  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    I stopped back at the gunsmith and it is the chamber, that is allowing the cases to grow in width.
    Why this has started to happen, I have no idea. The gunsmith just said that short mags just have a much shorter life than other cartridges.

    Thanks everyone.

    Who was the gunsmith (pm if you want). I have been going to one here for some stuff and I’m starting to get the idea that he is a bit off on some stuff. WSM are hot but as others have said 1000 factory rounds isn’t a lot, should be able to get at least twice that.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    If you want just to re-barrel it why not just give Ruger a call and see what they would do it for?

    A lot of times by the time that you buy the barrel, pay someone to put it on, re-blue it or have what ever finish you want done you will be close if not way over the price of a new rifle.
    yep rugers are cheap.get a new one.
    AS GOES THE CHURCH, SO GOES THE NATION

  9. #18
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    get a 300 wsm barrel.

    300wsm can push 270wsm weight bullets faster with less barrel length, win-win.

    I'd get a 23 or 24" with a 11" twist.

  10. #19
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    If you decide to rebarrel the m77 , the .300 wsm would be a good upgrade to that .270 wsm and would otherwise function with the bolt and mag well fine.
    I strongly agree with others though, about the unlikely hood that it's shot out that quickly with just factory ammo.
    I would look hard at the bolt and locking lug area for a problem of some sort.
    Could be as simple as a build up of crud or some lead in the locking lug area.
    If you need or just want a rebarrel, the Ruger m77 is as easily worked on as the Remington 700. It can be done DIY for someone with the skill and tools. But a little tuff for the average guy.
    Very easy to do for guns that have a barrel nut like on Savage and Mossburg rifles. Prechambered barrels can be purchased with a barrel nut for the 700 to make it alot easier. But I don't know about the Ruger.
    Witch means a partially chambered barrel is threaded on and then a reamer is used to fully finish the chamber at the proper head space, and then checked with a go and a no go gauges.
    That may be a bit much for the average do it yourselfer ,but no problem for anyone that calls themselves a gunsmith.
    Diagnosis of a problem can be a bit more tricky though. Even for a smith sometimes.

  11. #20
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    rifle went back to ruger, we shall see.

 

 
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