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  1. #1
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    2018 coyote count started today

    I got a pair of coyotes today. We had a heifer prematurely abort a calf today and I saw a coyote circling trying to get at the calf while feeding. I got a clear angle and dropped it at 220yds with my 25-06 and a 100gr Ballistic tip. It was sitting on it's butt and broadside looking at the heifer.

    I got done in time to make 3 sets calling after work. The first came up empty, and I screwed up the second. I got up after 19 minutes thinking the stand was over and wanting to get 2 more sets in before dark, and a coyote immediately started barking. He may have been an educated one that wouldn't commit, or just a late one. I barked back and mimicked him for several minutes until he went silent, and then sat for another 10 minutes in case he snuck in. I ran a real quiet vole squeak for a few seconds, off for a minute, 10 seconds just in case I could make him curious enough to pop out.

    I had time for one quick set after that and set up prone on a terrace overlooking a big brome field. I had the call 60yds out from me. I howled right off since time was short, then did 3 minutes of vole squeaks on low volume. I then went to a kiyi and got a female to show up. She was going to circle really wide of me as she showed up while the call was on mute. I got it off mute before she got downwind and she came in at a run. I shot her 21yds from the call when she finally hit the brakes. She was quartering toward me and the 25-06 made a mess on the exit after penetrating that much coyote. I thought shots might be getting long for the AR since I'm hunting spots I've already hunted and coyotes are getting smarter now so I went to the bigger gun. Today had plenty of wind too. I might have to go back to the AR though, the guy I give my coyotes too would appreciate smaller holes than the second one had. I could load up some more 100gr Sirocco II bullets too, those seem to drop coyotes without the big holes but they are a pretty expensive bullet for coyotes and foul the rifle pretty quick.

    I ended up with 36 total for 2017, I missed a 180yd shot with the AR a few days before the new year. I had a coyote sneak in from an unexpected angle and spotted him sitting there at last light. I had to make a big move and got spotted. He didn't leave but I didn't know if I could make another move into a more comfortable shooting position. I ended up shooting while leaning backward holding myself with my core muscles, not leaning forward into the bipod like I prefer. I pulled the shot to the right I think. I was due for a miss, I was 10 for 10 with the AR before that. I can shoot but I can't call that streak exactly normal.

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  3. #2
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    Always like your yote stories. The calf incident reminds me of a time I was bowhunting near the edge of a pasture and I could see a cow that had a stuck calf. The coyotes were eating the calf while half of it was still in the cow. Most barbaric thing I have ever seen.

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckbull View Post
    Always like your yote stories. The calf incident reminds me of a time I was bowhunting near the edge of a pasture and I could see a cow that had a stuck calf. The coyotes were eating the calf while half of it was still in the cow. Most barbaric thing I have ever seen.
    Thanks, I like telling them once it gets dark and I can't be out shooting them! I think I'm going to head out again about 4, got ranch chores done pretty early today.

    When I was just old enough to ride my own horse and not slow Dad down I remember riding with him at daylight one morning checking cows during calving. We spooked a group of coyotes out of a draw as we rode up. Down in the draw a cow had been trying to calve and the calf was really big. She was paralyzed on the back half and couldn't stand up and the coyotes had been eating on her. It was really gruesome, and made me understand why Dad shot coyotes every chance he got. I've seen similar situations a few times over the years but luckily not for a long while. As the cattle genetics have improved and become easier to track calving issues like that have become really uncommon for us.

    After a ranch a few miles west of us sold all their sheep the coyotes concentrated there needed a new food source. Some of them showed up at our place during calving I think. Those coyotes had a system to distract the llamas they used for coyote control in the sheep pastures. The smaller female coyote would distract the llama while the bigger male drug the lamb off the other direction. I shot the male coyote out of 2 pairs that spring as they tried to do that with cows and calves. Both times the cow had calved on top of a ridge where dragging the calf a short distance off the back side got it out of sight and headed downhill where it was easier to drag faster. The problem has diminished with time as those coyotes have died out, but it still happens. I'm glad we never had a larger pack figure it out.

    I have lots of stories like that. Coyotes are an amazingly intelligent and adaptable animal I can't help but respect. I can't blame coyotes for being coyotes or hate them for doing what they have adapted to do, but they sure need kept in check. I was listening to an old podcast on my phone while waiting for a water tank to fill this morning where they interviewed the coyote calling champion Al Morris. He said that even if 75% of the adult coyotes are removed from an area in a year, the remaining 25% can have enough pups to put the total number of adults the following year back to the same. I read a study years ago that universities in TX, NE, and ND if I remember right did that said the same thing except they came up with 80%. Guess I better keep shooting them!

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