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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mallardsx2 View Post
    My new ram broke down 2 days before my mule deer hunt last year and So I drove a rented 2wd Jeep Compass across the United States and hunted out of it for 7 days. I drove home with horns practically poking through the roof of that match box. It sounded like it was powered by a fan when you gassed it....lol
    That's not dumb, that's dedicated!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtncowboy View Post
    We were sheep hunting trying to get into an extremely rugged basin 20 miles away from the trailhead and had been battling hard all day picking our way through some nasty stuff. We had just climbed back onto the horses after leading them straight up a steep hill. We had to cross a chunk of exposed bedrock and I knew I should get off my horse. I was tired so I didn't, I held my breath and I crossed on the one foot wide chunk of dirt, the only dirt patch there. Just as I hit dirt on the other side I heard metal horse shoes clawing on bedrock, sure enough, my wife who was behind me paid for my dumb decision. The horse lost it's grip and fell, luckily my wife got her leg out of the way and they slid for 15 feet downhill. Thankfully, the chunk of bedrock turned a 90 degree angle and they hit dirt and stopped before going over a cliff. That was one of the scariest moments of my life. I went back in there this summer and the scratches from those horse shoes still remain on the rock. That was one of the dumbest things I have ever done, I even knew I shouldn't have attempted it, and I had that little voice telling me no, but I did it anyway. Lucky for us, it all turned out okay. It still gives me nightmares.
    That does sound like it would give you nightmares!
    Unfortunately, getting off the horse doesn't always work out either.
    I was riding out in the dark one evening after an elk hunt. It was pitch dark and we came to an icy patch on a steep slope. I got off to walk my horse across. Half way we both lost our footing at the same time. I went down on my back and he lurched forward to try and get his footing. Next thing I knew I was on my back directly under him and all four of his feet were pounding all around me as he tried not to fall. Somehow he managed to get his feet set without stomping me or falling on me. I sure was glad to get out from under him and off of that ice.

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  4. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winchester View Post
    That does sound like it would give you nightmares!
    Unfortunately, getting off the horse doesn't always work out either.
    I was riding out in the dark one evening after an elk hunt. It was pitch dark and we came to an icy patch on a steep slope. I got off to walk my horse across. Half way we both lost our footing at the same time. I went down on my back and he lurched forward to try and get his footing. Next thing I knew I was on my back directly under him and all four of his feet were pounding all around me as he tried not to fall. Somehow he managed to get his feet set without stomping me or falling on me. I sure was glad to get out from under him and off of that ice.
    Now that's a good horse.

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slugz View Post
    Now that's a good horse.
    He sure was ... passed away now unfortunately.

  6. #55
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    Oh wow! Scary horse stories.

    I have a couple, but don't involve hunting, and we're when I very first started riding. Horses can be really spooky.

  7. #56
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    Not willing to tell on myself yet, I'll relay a story about a couple of buddies on an antelope hunt a few years back. After 3 days of hard hunting in hot and dry conditions, they decided to take day 4 easier, driving around spotting. First light found them on a rise and right off they spotted a shooter. Grabbing only their rifles they started what they thought would be a quarter mile attempt. They were busted a couple of times but the buck never ran completely off and remained in their view. Long story short, 10 am found them a couple of miles from the truck with a downed antelope and the temp. was rising. Not too worried yet, they gutted the animal and were carrying it between them my the legs. Crossing the first dry gulch they spotted some cattle in the shade of what few trees were there. As they approached, a huge bull got up and was staring them down. Just as they thought they were going to escape his wrath, he rushed them. They scrambled up an almost vertical stream bank and the bull positioned at the bottom snorting and throwing dirt in the air. Every time they tried to get to the antelope, they were rushed again. Finally all of the cattle moved on and they retrieved the antelope. By now it's after 12 and starting to get hot. Really feeling the result of hot, dry heat and no water, they pushed on, making it to the truck in the late afternoon. They beat the desert this time, but now neither one will go take a pee without his day pack. It was their first antelope hunt. Now they both claim they don't like antelope meat but I think it's something else keeping them from applying again.

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  9. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bonecollector View Post
    That's not dumb, that's dedicated!
    That is a classic! But....Pictures or it didn't happen... I actually believe you, a 95 Oldsmobile may have taken me to the trailhead a few times...
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  10. #58
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    I have another one.

    Back in the late 80's we were going to Wyoming deer & antelope hunting. My Dad was driving his older pickup towing a travel trailer. I had my truck with a cabover camper towing my 4wd Toyota pu. My son was with Dad and I had a friend with me. I got to camp first and setup, waiting for Dad to show. About midnight they limped into camp. Dad was having clutch problems. Some of our Wyoming friends told Dad to take the truck into Powder River to a friend who was a mechanic. Dad got it there and the guy loaned him a 4x4 older stakebed truck to use while he fixed Dad's truck.

    We went deer hunting the next day. Everybody got out at a canyon we wanted to hunt and Dad told me to take the stake truck down to the bottom and work back up to where they were. I got almost to the bottom and saw a real nice 4x4 in the bottom. I jumped out and leaned across the hood and shoot. NOTHING! I shot again. NOTHING. One more time and Still nothing. I couldn't understand how I could miss a standing deer at 100 yards! I did notice a funny echo each time I shot. The deer was long gone by this time.

    Later when we all got back together, Dad said what happened to the truck? I said I didn't know, seemed fine to me. But on inspection, there were 3 holes in the edge of the hood and fender! Crappolla...I'd shot the loaned truck full of holes! I couldn't see the barrel and as I was shooting down, I hit the truck. When we took it back, I offered to pay for it getting fixed. The mechanic said...."Hell no, I want the holes there so I can tell everybody what those crazy Californians did to my truck! "

    I still see these friends in Wyoming today, I still get reminded of my shooting ability.
    Last edited by Colorado Cowboy; 12-07-2017 at 04:18 PM.
    Colorado Cowboy
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    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
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  12. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Cowboy View Post
    I have another one.

    Back in the late 80" we were going to Wyoming deer & antelope hunting. My Dad was driving his older pickup towing a travel trailer. I had my truck with a cabover camper towing my 4wd Toyota pu. My son was with Dad and I had a friend with me. I got to camp first and setup, waiting for dad to show. About midnight they limped into camp. Dad was having clutch problems. Some of our Wyoming friends told Dad to take the truck into Powder River to a friend who was a mechanic. Dad got it there and the guy loaned him a 4x4 older stakebed truck to use while he fixed Dad's truck.

    We went deer hunting the next day. Everybody got out a canyon we wanted to hunt and Dad told me to take the stake truck down to the bottom and work back up to where they were. I got almost to the bottom and saw a real nice 4x4 in the bottom. I jumped out and leaned across the hood and shoot. NOTHING! I shot again. NOTHING. One more time and Still nothing. I couldn't understand how I could miss a standing deer at 100 yards! I did notice a funny echo each time I shot. The deer was long gone by this time.

    Later when we all got back together, Dad said what happened to the truck? I said I didn't know, seemed fine to me. But on inspection, there were 3 holes in the edge of the hood and fender! Crappolla...I'd shot the loaned truck full of holes! I couldn't see the barrel and as I was shooting down, I hit the truck. When we took it back, I offered to pay for it getting fixed. The mechanic said...."Hell no, I want the holes there so I can tell everybody what those crazy Californians did to his truck!

    I still see these friends in Wyoming today, I still get reminded of my shooting ability.
    That is a classic story!
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  13. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Cowboy View Post
    I have another one.

    Back in the late 80's we were going to Wyoming deer & antelope hunting. My Dad was driving his older pickup towing a travel trailer. I had my truck with a cabover camper towing my 4wd Toyota pu. My son was with Dad and I had a friend with me. I got to camp first and setup, waiting for Dad to show. About midnight they limped into camp. Dad was having clutch problems. Some of our Wyoming friends told Dad to take the truck into Powder River to a friend who was a mechanic. Dad got it there and the guy loaned him a 4x4 older stakebed truck to use while he fixed Dad's truck.

    We went deer hunting the next day. Everybody got out at a canyon we wanted to hunt and Dad told me to take the stake truck down to the bottom and work back up to where they were. I got almost to the bottom and saw a real nice 4x4 in the bottom. I jumped out and leaned across the hood and shoot. NOTHING! I shot again. NOTHING. One more time and Still nothing. I couldn't understand how I could miss a standing deer at 100 yards! I did notice a funny echo each time I shot. The deer was long gone by this time.

    Later when we all got back together, Dad said what happened to the truck? I said I didn't know, seemed fine to me. But on inspection, there were 3 holes in the edge of the hood and fender! Crappolla...I'd shot the loaned truck full of holes! I couldn't see the barrel and as I was shooting down, I hit the truck. When we took it back, I offered to pay for it getting fixed. The mechanic said...."Hell no, I want the holes there so I can tell everybody what those crazy Californians did to my truck! "

    I still see these friends in Wyoming today, I still get reminded of my shooting ability.

    That's hilarious CC.
    I know you do a lot of shooting demonstrations/competitions now ... maybe you should add something like that in as a trick shot :-)

 

 
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