Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Zachary, LA
    Posts
    425
    Thanks
    232
    Thanked 99 Times in 77 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 176 Times in 16 Posts

    I learned a lot from my dad but some was learned on here and some self taught. We always used the gutless method growing up and I remember helping wrap and debone quarters when I was a youngster. I enjoy it and I like my boys seeing me do it. They're still a little small to get involved but will watch me until they get bored.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Gypsum, Co
    Posts
    1,661
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 591 Times in 440 Posts
    Congratulations
    18
    Congratulated 141 Times in 32 Posts
    My dad, he would use 95% of the deer and or elk that I brought home.

    He would of consider the gutless method wanton waste of good game meat. Just for the amount of meat left on the bones. He would make soup out of the bones and my mom made a fantastic boiled BBQ sauce flavored soup with the ribs where the meat would just fall off of the bones and be as tender as toilet paper, it was to die for. The hocks were thrown into the soup pot with beans and some bacon. I never did hear of ground game meat, all the trimmings was put into packages labeled either fry meat or stew.
    If you don't care where you are, you are not lost....

  3. #13
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    4,067
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked 2,259 Times in 1,004 Posts
    Congratulations
    38
    Congratulated 158 Times in 72 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    My dad, he would use 95% of the deer and or elk that I brought home.

    He would of consider the gutless method wanton waste of good game meat. Just for the amount of meat left on the bones. He would make soup out of the bones and my mom made a fantastic boiled BBQ sauce flavored soup with the ribs where the meat would just fall off of the bones and be as tender as toilet paper, it was to die for. The hocks were thrown into the soup pot with beans and some bacon. I never did hear of ground game meat, all the trimmings was put into packages labeled either fry meat or stew.
    I pack the hocks out, but haven't ever done a soup with them.

    There are a few people who still do the rib roll thing in some places.
    www.eastmans.com
    blog.eastmans.com
    www.wingmen.us

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Dolores, Colorado
    Posts
    5,023
    Thanks
    1,313
    Thanked 1,919 Times in 1,099 Posts
    Congratulations
    263
    Congratulated 312 Times in 85 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ScottR View Post
    I pack the hocks out, but haven't ever done a soup with them.
    Oso Bucco with the front lower legs!
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA, NRA certified Range Safety Officer, Pistol Instructor, Rifle Instructor, RMEF, Boone & Crockett Club.
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Colorado Cowboy For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    1,077
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 248 Times in 208 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 162 Times in 20 Posts
    Self taught also with a lot of trial and error! I messed up big time on making my own sausage and ruined about 30lbs of meat but I'm slowly trying to work myself back into it.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    790
    Thanks
    1,390
    Thanked 219 Times in 190 Posts
    Congratulations
    1,267
    Congratulated 307 Times in 42 Posts
    I grew up helping the family process our own hogs, cows, sheep, chickens etc., as well as, cutting our own elk, deer and bear. I can't remember exactly when I learned, but Dad and Mom must have been the teachers. All six of us kids had to help with the meat processing just like anything else in our house. I've kind of customized my own methods, but it's still real similar to the original process I've been doing all along. I take great pride in changing peoples minds that say they don't like wild game. I can't remember one person that tried our home processed game that didn't really like it.

  8. #17
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    4,067
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked 2,259 Times in 1,004 Posts
    Congratulations
    38
    Congratulated 158 Times in 72 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by gonhunting247 View Post
    I grew up helping the family process our own hogs, cows, sheep, chickens etc., as well as, cutting our own elk, deer and bear. I can't remember exactly when I learned, but Dad and Mom must have been the teachers. All six of us kids had to help with the meat processing just like anything else in our house. I've kind of customized my own methods, but it's still real similar to the original process I've been doing all along. I take great pride in changing peoples minds that say they don't like wild game. I can't remember one person that tried our home processed game that didn't really like it.
    I love sharing game with people who have never had it!
    www.eastmans.com
    blog.eastmans.com
    www.wingmen.us

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to ScottR For This Useful Post:


  10. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Alta Loma CA
    Posts
    645
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked 216 Times in 148 Posts
    Congratulations
    439
    Congratulated 198 Times in 26 Posts

    Dad had us clean everything we killed at a young age his motto was you kill it you clean it and eat it. This reminds me of when i was about 8 years old i went with my dad deer hunting but i couldn't keep up with him so he left me at a large cactus patch with a 410 single shot and a pocket full of shells a canteen of water and a P&J sandwich 4hr later him came back to find a pile of Rabbits at least 30 i was so proud of my day of hunting Dad just smiled and loaded the rabbits in he pack and we went home i was up tell midnight cleaning cold stinky rabbits. Dad taught me how to butcher and try to be more selective on what i kill.
    processing animals that iv harvested brings me much joy thanks to my Dad
    Trying like hell to live the dream,Nomad

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to dustin ray For This Useful Post:


 

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •