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  1. #1
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    Smoker: electric or propane

    Smoker: Guys I've been looking at the Masterbuilt smokers at Cabelas and Sportsmans Warehouse. I cannot decide on the propane or the electric. Asking for advise from folks who have them or have used both types. What would you get?

    Thanks for the help.
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  2. #2
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    I have a Masterbuilt electric smoker and I must say I like it. It has a remote sensor that tells me the temp inside the smoker and the internal temp of whatever I'm smoking. I just roll it out of the shed and plug it in. No need to worry about whether I have enough propane for however many hours I plan on using it.
    The tray for wood chips is kind of small so if you need continuous smoke for a 12-16 hour brisket or pork shoulder it would be a pain to keep filling it every couple of hours. So far the longest smoking time I've used it for was about 6 hours so it was no problem.
    I have learned through trial and error that it is possible to over-smoke some meats.
    As far s the difference between electric or propane performance I couldn't tell you.
    Good luck with whichever one you choose.

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    When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.

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  4. #3
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    I have an electric Masterbuilt (also from Cabelas) that I have been using for 7 or 8 years. I prefer the electric as I usually don't take it anywhere where there is no elec. I do have a generator if I wanted to use it. Propane was a little more cumbersome as you need the tank. If I took it with me on a lot of trip where I was camping, I might want the propane one.
    Colorado Cowboy
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  6. #4
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    Get electric. My cousin does BBQ/Smoke competitively. He's all in to the $4,000 pellet smokers. But his pulled pork doesn't taste much different than mine. He recommended I get electric.

    I got the base level Bradley Original Smoker that uses the briquettes. It was cheap.

    The really important thing to get is a a remote meat thermometer. One sensor is in the meat, the other in the unit to monitor cook temp.

    I set everything up, get meat in the smoker, turn it on...get the temp up to desired range, then sit in my house and wait for the meat sensor to hit the magic number. It's as simple as that.

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  8. #5
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    Go electric. Nobody smokes anywhere where there's not electricity. I love my masterbuilt electric smoker for doing jerky, poultry and pork butts. If you buy a big enough electric smoker, you can do ribs on them as well. I prefer to do my ribs and briskets on a wood fired smoker.
    In my humblest of humble opinions, certain things you just cannot taste the difference between electric and wood fired. Jerky, poultry and pork butts fall into this category. Brisket does not.

    The best thing about the electric is just setting it and forgetting it.. Not sure a propane smoker would be as 'set and forget' as electric.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

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  10. #6
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    I have been researching Pellet grills/smokers like crazy. My buddy just bought a Green Mountain Grill pellet smoker and loves it. He cooked me up some tri-tip and it was amazing. Might be an option to look into as well.

    Good luck!

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  12. #7
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    I have both and like both... Both are capable of cooking great food. My electric is a little more convenient at home but the propane one is nice for tailgating and camping. If your buying it strictly for home use, electric is the way to go.

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  14. #8
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    Thanks for all the help! Electric it is. I cannot wait to use it to smoke a turkey using apple wood! I've done that on a Brinkman briquet smoker and oh man does it taste good. I also cannot wait to get some deer and elk meat to do jerky in it. I have a dehydrator I've used to make jerky and it is excellent, but I want to try it on the smoker and use a little wood to add a bit of smoky taste to it.

    David
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  15. #9
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    Real wood, that's all I use.

  16. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6mm Remington View Post
    Thanks for all the help! Electric it is. I cannot wait to use it to smoke a turkey using apple wood! I've done that on a Brinkman briquet smoker and oh man does it taste good. I also cannot wait to get some deer and elk meat to do jerky in it. I have a dehydrator I've used to make jerky and it is excellent, but I want to try it on the smoker and use a little wood to add a bit of smoky taste to it.

    David
    Once you smoke your jerky, you'll never use the dehydrator again.

    Pro tip for smoking jerky: Smoke it for a few hours, as low as that smoker will go.. When the meat is sufficiently cooked, I finish it in the oven. Again, oven as low as it will go, and crack open the oven a bit, to let moisture out.
    Consider yourself lucky if half the batch makes it through the oven phase, as you probably won't be able to help yourself from snacking on it before it's actual 'jerky'
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

 

 
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