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  1. #11
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    I won't leave home without a spotter for high country mule deer and I pack in deep and steep. But that spotter has saved me many painful miles along with helping find bucks in trees during mid day hours

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntnguide View Post
    I won't leave home without a spotter for high country mule deer and I pack in deep and steep. But that spotter has saved me many painful miles along with helping find bucks in trees during mid day hours

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    You point out something that needs to be considered. Using a spotting scope is not easy. Learning to "see" what you are looking at is an art that is developed with practice. If you really havn't used one a lot and are not really proficient in it's use, bring some good binos and a tripod.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA, NRA certified Range Safety Officer, Pistol Instructor, Rifle Instructor, RMEF, Boone & Crockett Club.
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
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  5. #13
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    I'd say take it. Getting a closer look at the buck usually isn't possible unless you outright go on a stalk and at that point you are committed. I used my spotter as much for look at/sizing up deer as reading terrain and planning a stalk. You can see the small land features better in a scope further out in my opinion. Agree with everyone else on getting your binos on a tripod. Very well worth it.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

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  7. #14
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    Any time I'm trying to decide if I should take a spotter or not I take the little Nikon ED50. I would take a tripod for the binos anyway, it's light enough I just take it along at 20.4oz with adapter and protective case. Especially if you aren't looking really far a small spotter should work. If you were dead set on a certain score buck and glassing long distance I'd say maybe take a big spotter, but a good quality small spotter would do what you are asking.

    I'm going to replace the Nikon with a Kowa 55mm for my small spotter in the near future. They are supposed to be very impressive, but they are also expensive. A little heavier too at 28.2oz without an adapter or case, but still much lighter than a Swaro 65mm.

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  9. #15
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    I use the sub compact leupold 15-30x50mm, which I use during the hunt.
    I have a 65mm and 80mm, which I use for scouting.

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  11. #16
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    I don't venture above timberline without one. It can save you A LOT of hiking when deciding if it's a buck you want to go after. Ascope let's you confirm. JMO
    BOHNTR )))----------->

    B&C / P&Y Official Measurer

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  13. #17
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    Based on your description of the area you will be hunting, I would absolutely say bring the spotter. I've never regretted having mine in my pack, even though it does add to my pack wt. You will be able to find those bedded / hidden animals with your spotter that you would likely not see with your binos.
    Good Luck on your hunt.

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  15. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mboyett1976 View Post
    I'm heading out for an early season high country mule deer hunt and will be packing in 5+ miles to 12,500 feet elevation. This drainage is fairly narrow all the way to the top. The farthest I will be able to see is approximately 1.25 miles. I'm just pondering if I should lug 5 pounds of scope/tripod up the mountain. I'm not going to be counting inches and points. Just want to take a good representative buck. Thoughts?
    I say take it, very rarely has plan A worked out, so if you may need to relocate for whatever reason, you are prepared for whatever the next drainage offers. Also, being able to glass up those bedded bucks mid day with binos is do-able but much easier with a spotter.

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  17. #19
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    Take it, if nothing else it will be in the truck if you need it. A spotter you can digiscope with is well worth it.
    NRA Life Member
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  19. #20
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    It all depends. If going into an area that you are not familiar with and or werent able to scout a ton then take it. If I know the area/animal movement I'm a bino/tripod guy.

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