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  1. #21
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    Garmin GPSMAP 64 primary ... Compass for backup

  2. #22
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    Gps, compass, map, phone. Mostly use the compass & map

  3. #23
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    Garmin 650t GPS w/ OnXmap GPS chip.. Rugged design, I also have a spare rechargeable lithium ion battery for it.. If things get real bad, it also takes AA batteries as well.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    I've got a pretty good internal one but I have gotten turned around a couple of times and then my instincts have taken over and took me in the right direction.

    Sometimes I even surprise myself.
    I'm the same way, with a great internal compass, though not as good as it used to be.

    I think the reason it's not as good as it used to be is that I think an internal compass is nothing more than a very good visual memory and many little things become landmarks. Like everything but wisdom, my visual memory is not as good as it was.

    Plus, I intuitively keep track of easy clues like the sun, moon, stars, mountains, shadow direction, the north sides of hills and trees and prevailing wind direction for that day (which can throw you off in some places, especially out West).

    I can get as lost as anyone in the dark, even going to a familiar place. I've tried to walk a fairly short distance to my stand with no headlamp before dawn and found I have to turn it on at some point.

    The first time I found that I had walked in a circle even though I tried to take a roughly equal number of right and left turns around obstacles, it really humbled me. I always carry a compass now.
    Last edited by hoshour; 04-21-2017 at 11:41 AM.

  5. #25
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    I use an old Magellan GPS to mark things and generally stumble around. I have Avenza maps on my phone and carry at least one paper map, just because I have a map fetish. I also carry a really good compass (Brunton Pocket Transit) and know how to use it. I always assume every battery I have with me will die, so I never totally depend on anything electronic.

    There is nothing like a really good GPS when following a tough blood trail in cedar swamps after dark. Mark each blood drop, and when you lose the trail, check the GPS. Chances are you either took a wrong turn or the trail headed for water or away from a road. It also makes it possible to come back in the morning to the exact point where you left off.

  6. #26
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    As most have stated correctly GPS and Compass are musts. Phone too though you can become easily masted under trees which kills reception.

    GPS and compass should be best you can afford. I prefer the Garmin Rino line with GPS because it is also a radio as well as polling or pinging feature which has gotten me out of a pinch or two.


    Compass- good quality military grade Lensatic with topo map. As somone rhetorically stated "technology never fails" unless you're in back country, and there is a lot of iron content in the ground which throws off the GPS reading - really. I and several others tested this out in the area above Breckenridge several years ago. The compass heading was steady whereas the GPS compass became sporadic due to magnetization.


    A good quality compass will not fail you and topo maps are prolific and most o the time , free.

  7. #27
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    I don't have a phone but I use a Garmin Rhino GPS, map, and compass. It comes down to what you're comfortable with. I chuckle when I hear people say that a GPS guided somebody to the wrong place, I suspect that the problem was the operator and not the GPS. I've got a friend that bought a top of the line GPS for elk season last year. I spent more time trying to teach him how to use it and navigate with it than he spent actually using it. I finally gave up trying to help, it was just beyond his ability to understand but according to him it was the GPS that was wrong.

  8. #28
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    Rino: all day and all night to cover ground
    Map: pull this out if needed, but usually just for planning at night
    Compass: Only get this out at night if my GPS has died or I need to check the compass calibration.

    Hoshour hit it on the head. The second we lose our visual stimuli in the dark, it becomes apparent that we have no internal compass at all. The only thing we have left is a feeling of the terrain. I have a bum leg. If I don't monitor my travel in the dark, I become the guy who walks in a 1/4 mile circle. It is pretty obvious that vision is the key for keeping us on a target when we walk. Funny how your brain will compensate for things like awkward loads, limps, sloping ground, etc.

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  10. #29
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    It's a proven fact that without a known visual point to guide on people will always tend to move in a circle, some say that right handed people move predominately one direction and left handed in the opposite direction- I can't remember which direction but in either case you're still lost.

    Luckily I live where I hunt so I've gotten pretty good at navigating without tools but I still take my GPS, map, and compass. I use the GPS to mark points of interest when I'm scouting or hunting and the map and compass just help me stay aware of what's around me - which helps when I need to try to predict where a travelling elk or deer might be headed or why they're headed the way they are.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rammont View Post
    I don't have a phone but I use a Garmin Rhino GPS, map, and compass. It comes down to what you're comfortable with. I chuckle when I hear people say that a GPS guided somebody to the wrong place, I suspect that the problem was the operator and not the GPS. I've got a friend that bought a top of the line GPS for elk season last year. I spent more time trying to teach him how to use it and navigate with it than he spent actually using it. I finally gave up trying to help, it was just beyond his ability to understand but according to him it was the GPS that was wrong.

    I think the practice of navigation is a dying art and frankly one that must be practiced diligently when you're in the woods, with and without navigation tools. There is absolute truth in the notion that people tend to blame things for failure instead taking personal responsibility for their shortcomings

    However I find your comments interesting that technology or more specifically the GPS can't fail. It does and in fact has. I've witnessed it along with about three others in a camp of about ten. The Garmin Rino is rock solid but the compass headings were thrown off a few times- in real time when we were testing them in a certain area after the morning hunt.

    Which is why I strongly advocate using and practicing with all resources like a topo map, compass as well as maintaining the internal compass.

    Technology can and does fai,just like the humans that invented the technology

 

 
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